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Tips For Planting Seed Potatoes

Tuesday, January 5th, 2021

Tips for planting seed potatoes from J&N Feed and Seed in Graham, Texas.Onion sets and seed potatoes arrive mid-January at J&N Feed and Seed. Planting seed potatoes and onions are at the top of everyone’s gardening list this time of year. As everyone in North Texas knows, our late January and February weather can be a gamble— temps can be spring-like one day and fall below freezing the next.  But, the weather extremes should not deter gardeners from planting during these months.  Potatoes are top of the list for planting this time of year.

Other good go-to cold weather vegetables are root produce such as turnips, beets, and carrots as well as hardy leafy greens like spinach, cabbage, kale, and chard. Bulb veggies (onions and garlic), as well as asparagus crowns, can also be planted at this time.

Preparing and Planting Potatoes 

When purchasing seed potatoes, look for certified seed potatoes. These are seeding potatoes that have not been treated with growth retardants to prevent sprouting. Conventional potatoes in grocery markets are typically treated with retardants.

After you have planned and prepared a garden spot with well-drained, loose soil, the seed potatoes can be prepped for planting:

Cut each seed potato into quarters (sulfur dust can be applied to the fresh cut ends) and let the potato quarters set out overnight or longer until cut sides callus over.  Seed potato quarters are then ready to plant— for a good rule of thumb, potato quarters should be planted 3” to 4” deep and spaced 12” to 15” apart. To provide plants plenty of growing room, make sure rows are spaced 24” to 36” apart.

Caring for Potato Plants

Potatoes need consistent moisture, so water regularly when tubers start to form.  Before the potato plants bloom, hilling should be done when the plant is about 6 inches tall. Hoe the dirt up around the base of the plant in order to cover the root as well as to support the plant. Bury the plant base in loose soil. Hilling will keep the potato plants from getting sunburned, in which case they turn green and will taste bitter.  You will need to hill potatoes every couple of weeks to protect your crop.

When the potato plants have bloomed, new potatoes are ready for harvest.  For larger potatoes, harvest only after plant tops has fallen over. For more information on planting seed potatoes, visit the Texas A&M website.

Other Cool Weather Vegetable Plantings

Lettuce, spinach, and cabbage can be planted at this time either by seeds or plant starts. For reference, these vegetables can be planted in February with seed or starter plants.

Stop by J&N for your seed potatoes, onion sets, and other cool-weather vegetables.

2021 Young County Jr. Livestock Show

Tuesday, January 5th, 2021
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2021 Young County Jr. Livestock Show kicks off  Wednesday, January 13, 2021, and runs through Saturday, January 16, 2021

Source: Young Co.Jr. Livestock Show

The 2021 Young County Jr. Livestock Show kicks off  Wednesday, January 13, 2021, and runs through Saturday, January 16, 2021, in the Main Arena of the Young County Arena. Come out and show your support for our local kids at this great event.

Before you head to the arena, stop by J&N Feed and Seed for Sullivan Show Supplies, show feeds by Lindner, Moorman, Honor Show Chow, shavings, and more. Let our experts help you raise a winner in the ring this show season. Good luck to everyone showing this year!

LocationYoung County Arena – 120 Barclay Blvd. Graham, TX

Date: Wednesday, January 13th  through Saturday, January 16, 2021

Click here for driving directions to Young County Arena.

January Garden Tips

Tuesday, December 29th, 2020

January Garden Tips

It may be chilly outside at this time of the year, but winter is a perfect time for a number of outdoor chores. Just consider how much better outdoor chores like soil preparation, planting, transplanting, and pruning can be done without toiling in hot summer temperatures.

January Garden If you need to move a plant to a different spot in the landscape, this is the month to accomplish this job. Most plants move best when they are fully dormant as a result of prolonged exposure to cold temperatures. Remove some of the top growth to compensate for the inevitable loss of some of the roots. Once the plant is moved, water thoroughly, apply root stimulator, and a few inches of mulch over the root area.

January is a great month to accomplish pruning of fruit trees. Annual pruning keeps the harvest within reach, thins crowded branches, allowing more light to penetrate developing fruit and stimulates new growth for next year’s crop. Shade trees can also be pruned at this time.

Fruit trees and vines can be planted at this time as the ground usually does not freeze here in north Texas. You can also prepare the soil for new flower, rose or shrub beds by mixing plenty of organic material like compost or a flower or shrub mix. This way the soil is ready for immediate planting when temperatures get a little warmer.

Fertilize pansies to keep them actively growing. Houseplants can be fertilized with reduced rates of water-soluble fertilizer this month. Do not over-water your houseplants.

Birds of all kinds appreciate a constant source of seed, suet and water during the winter and you will enjoy the activity they create in your backyard. Just remember once you start feeding, you should keep it up through the winter.

Tips for Raising Chickens in Winter

Monday, December 7th, 2020

Raising chickens in winter can be a lot of fun. Some hens love wandering around the yard and their first snow sighting can be quite entertaining. A bird’s thick feathers are a natural protective coat, so most breeds are well-equipped for winter.

Here are a few tips on how to care for chickens in the winter:

1. How to keep chickens warm in winter:

Do not add heat lamps. Chickens, especially cold-tolerant breeds, can withstand winter temperatures without supplemental heat. A chicken’s body temperature is around 106 degrees Fahrenheit, and they have their own protective layer of feathers to keep them warm.

If you feel it is necessary to provide a source of heat, only provide enough heat to raise the temperature a few degrees. The hens will adjust to the cold temperature, but if it is 70 degrees Fahrenheit in the coop and 0 degrees Fahrenheit in the run, birds will not be able to regulate their body temperature.

2. What to feed chickens in winter:

A common myth is to feed oatmeal to birds in the winter. This is not a beneficial treat for chickens. Oats contain some types of fiber that chickens can’t digest which can cause the contents of the digestive tract to thicken. This leads to a reduction in the bird’s ability to digest and absorb nutrients. Greens are also unnecessary. Hens may pick at hay and spread it around, but they are not going to eat it.

Feeding a complete layer feed like Purina® Layena®, Purina® Layena® Plus Omega-3 or Purina® Organic Pellets or Crumbles will provide the necessary nutrition hens need through the winter.

3. Ensure feed and water isn’t frozen.

Consider heated waterers. Feed and water birds more often when it’s below freezing. Energy needs increase in winter. Animals expend a considerable amount of energy to stay warm and will eat more feed. Complete layer feeds include all the energy hens need. The 90/10 rule still applies in winter.

4. Allow exploration.

Birds can tolerate snow, cold air and ice water. There is very little muscle in the lower part of bird legs and feet. The movements are controlled by tendons that stretch from the upper part of the legs down to the toes. \Secondly, the blood entering the lower legs and feet are cooled by the blood returning to the heart. The blood returning is thus warmed by the blood going to the toes. The tissue receives just enough heat to avoid frostbite while also being provided with enough oxygen to keep things functioning.

5. Collect eggs more frequently.

Temperatures below freezing result in frozen eggs. As the egg freezes, the contents expand and will cause the egg to crack.

6. Keep the chicken coop draft free.

But don’t seal it completely. Some air needs to be exchanged to prevent ammonia build up. Open the top vent or higher windows slightly so fresh air can enter and stale air can exit.

7. Keep the chicken coop dry.

Remove any wet spots daily. Provide more bedding than you would in other seasons so birds have a place to burrow and stay cozy.

8. Continue offering activities in the chicken coop.

Hens will spend more time in the coop, so offer enrichment. Logs, sturdy branches or chicken swings can work well and place a Purina® Flock Block® supplement in the coop for a nutritious place to peck.

Visit or call J & N Feed and Seed to get more tips for raising chickens in winter!

Article source: Purina Flock Management

December Garden Tips

Monday, November 30th, 2020

December Garden Tips

Working in your garden is an excellent escape during the holidays. It’s a great time of year to do some of the heavy work in the landscape as opposed to sweating it up in the heat of the summer.

Don’t put up the mower yet. Although turf grasses have stopped growing, you can use the mower to chop up and recycle the leaves back into the lawn or for a compost pile.

Prepare gas-powered engines for winter. The owner’s manual is the best guide to winterizing a lawn mower, tiller, garden tractor or other power equipment.

Drain and store garden hoses and watering equipment in a readily accessible location. Lawns and other plants may need an occasional watering during a prolonged dry spell.

In general, once the weather gets and stays cold, pruning of deciduous plants (ones that lose their leaves) can be safely done. Evergreen hedges can be sheared or cut back in the winter also. Wait until February to prune your roses. Remember – Do Not Top your Crapemyrtles! Simply prune to remove seed heads and shape.

Prepare for the cold weather before it hits! One of the best things you can do for your landscape plants is to provide a 2 to 3-inch layer of mulch. Mulching is necessary year round but during the colder periods, it provides a layer of insulation for the roots. Water your landscape well before a cold spell. A drought-stressed plant is more susceptible to freeze damage. For more tender plants, purchase frost cloth for extra protection. Cover the plant completely allowing the edges to come all the way to the ground, utilizing the heat which radiates from the ground.

December is a perfect time to plant trees and shrubs so they can develop a strong root system for next Spring. Cool weather color such as Pansies, Snapdragons, Cyclamen, Flowering Cabbage and Kale add splashes of color to your landscape. Spring flowering bulbs can be planted now once they have been properly chilled.

Make your home beautiful for the Holidays with a stunning assortment of floral quality Poinsettias, Cyclamen, freshest greenery and Christmas Trees. Add a mix of new indoor and tropical plants to energize your home décor.

Remember to provide food and water for the birds this winter. You can attract just as many birds with a bird bath as with food, especially during the dry spells. To draw a diversity of birds provide a variety of seeds, like sunflower, thistle, safflower, and millet; plus suet. Once you begin putting out bird food, continue feeding them through the springtime.

Winterize your Chicken Coop

Monday, November 2nd, 2020

when will pullet start to lay eggs- https://www.jandnfeedandseed.comWinter is upon us and egg production tends to slow down in late fall due to the shorter days. Lighting is a huge component to this decrease as well as the temperature drop. A laying hen’s endocrine system is stimulated by light so the shorter days slow egg production or can stop it completely. Some flock owners look at winter as a dormant break for their laying hens.  Other owners like to keep the production throughout the winter months. In order to do this, hens need more than 14 hours of light during the day.

Lighting:

A nine-watt compact fluorescent bulb is all that’s needed for a typical backyard coop. Plug the light into a timer and have it come on early enough in the morning to give the birds 15 hours of daylight, and egg production will be improved through the shorter days of winter.The light needs to light up the largest area possible. Clean the lamps once a week to keep them clean to output as much light as possible.

Heat Lamps:

Start this process in late fall since the lighting changes at that time. Make sure to hang the lamp or bulb up in the coop where the chickens can’t snuggle up to the lamp and cinge there feathers. Make sure the light reaches the whole coop and offers heat throughout.

Other Tips on Winterizing:

Keep the coop dry and clean. The best way to do this is to keep make sure the coop will not have standing water if rain comes. Make sure to replace the bedding with dry bedding each week.

Bedding also provides insulation for the chickens. Cover large holes where drafts or critters can enter. Be careful not to cover up all the holes so proper ventilation can occur.

Freezing temperatures can freeze up the water source. Think about getting a heated water source or pour fresh water each day.

It’s important to gather eggs daily because those can freeze as well.

Throw down extra feed or corn before they head to roost at night. This will provide energy and keep them warm at night.

Your flock needs some time and attention during the winter months to keep up with egg production. The extra work is worth it! You’ll have a full carton of eggs all winter!

 

November Traeger Grill Sale at J&N Feed

Thursday, October 29th, 2020
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November Traeger Grill Sale at J&N Feed and Seed in Graham, Texas.Stop by our November Traeger Grill Sale at J&N Feed and Seed, happening November 20-30, 2020.  If you’ve been eyeing one of our sweet Traeger Grills, now is the time to SAVE, during our November Traeger Grill Sale.

  • $100 off Traeger Pro 575 Grills
  • $100 off Traeger Pro 780 Grills
  • Ironwood Bundle – Purchase an Ironwood Grill and receive a free ultimate accessory bundle.

J&N Feed and Seed in Graham is your local dealer for Traeger Grills and Traeger wood pellets. Be it smoking, grilling, wood-fired convection oven, or BBQ, the Traeger Grill can satisfy all your grilling needs.

Simple and safe to operate, Traeger’s draft induction technology offers continuous convection cooking to ensure even heat distribution. The results are perfectly cooked food every time, with no flare-ups, no burnt food, and no hassles.

All you do is plug in and play! Can’t get any easier than that! Traegers require only a standard 110V household current. After an initial 300 watt heat up of the wood pellets, the grill uses the equivalent of a 50 watt light bulb, making the Traeger Pellet Grill one of the most energy-efficient grills on the market today. Using Traeger’s specially formulated natural hardwood pellets, food has a rich flavor unmatched by charcoal, gas grills, and smokers. Pellets come in a variety of woods, too— your grilling experience is only limited by your imagination.

Stop by J&N Feed and Seed in Graham and our team will happily show you our selection of Traeger Pellet Grills and accessories. We’ll get you up and grilling in no time— for many years to come!

November Traeger Grill Sale valid November 20  through November 30, 2020. 

Graham Holiday Shopping Spree – Shop Local This Season

Tuesday, October 27th, 2020
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The annual Graham Holiday Shopping Spree event is almost here! Shop J&N Feed in Graham, Texas this holiday season.The annual Graham Holiday Shopping Spree event is almost here!

Have you heard of this great program called the Holiday Shopping Spree right here in Graham?   Sponsored by the Graham Chamber of Commerce and Shop Graham First, Holiday Shopping Spree encourages patronage to local stores and businesses in Graham. This year the shopping spree will kick-off on Friday, November 27th, and run through Friday, December 18th. Lots of prizes are up for grabs, so fill those cards!

J&N Feed & Seed is a participating retailer.  Stop by and pick up your shopping spree card today and start shopping locally in Graham, Texas!

J&N Feed and Seed is a proud member of the Graham Chamber of Commerce and a proud participant of the Annual Shop Graham First Holiday Shopping Spree. Shop local this holiday season and help keep sales tax dollars right here in our great community. For more information, call the Graham Chamber of Commerce at 940-549-3355.

 

 

Texas Waterfowl Season Kicks off October 31

Monday, October 26th, 2020

 

Young Ducks Predicted This Season

For the Texas waterfowl season, our waterfowl program leader, Kevin Kraai, says, “Texas duck hunters will have the most opportunity for a fruitful season when hunting in East Texas and along the coast. Be mobile, as conditions will vary throughout the state.”

Reports from breeding grounds in the Dakotas tell us duck production was excellent this summer. This is especially good news, because hunters usually have more success when flocks include a lot of inexperienced young ducks.

Regular duck season opens 10/31 in the High Plains Mallard Management Unit, 11/7 in the South Zone, and on 11/14 in the North Zone.

General goose season opens 11/7 in the East Zone and 11/14 in the West Zone. Reports from Canada suggest that the Arctic goose hatch was poor this past summer, so juvenile snow geese will be in short supply for that declining overall population. Small Canada geese will likely be abundant in the Panhandle.

Find out more in the full waterfowl forecast.

What You Need to Know

Bag limits vary by species, so be sure and check the Outdoor Annual for all your waterfowl regulation information.

What you need to hunt waterfowl:

Your license can now be accessed digitally with the Outdoor Annual app or the My Texas Hunt Harvest app, or your emailed license receipt can be used to hunt waterfowl.

Ducks You’ll Find in Texas:

The Lone Star State has both year-round duck residents, as well as migrant visitors that winter here. All wild species of ducks are considered migratory game birds and are protected by state and federal laws.

Find out more about puddle and diving ducks in the video, Ducks.

Tips to Get You Home Safe and Sound:

Waterfowl hunts take place in locations that are often cold, wet, remote and dark. They come with unique risks that you must recognize and prepare for to avoid tragedy.

Prepare for your hunt by looking over our list of 7 safety tips and techniques just for waterfowlers. If you use a boat while hunting, use the risk assessment tool to help decrease those risks you can control. Let’s get everyone home safe and sound.

Visit J & N Feed and Seed to check out our wildlife selection.

Article source: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

Four Reasons for Preconditioning Calves

Friday, October 23rd, 2020

Preconditioning calves is one way that a farm or ranch can really add value, whether those cattle are staying on the farm or moving into a stocker or feedlot scenario. The producer implementing a preconditioning program may receive a higher premium. No matter where the calf goes after that, the opportunity for improved health and performance should be adding value from that program.

In times of high cattle prices, it’s not uncommon for producers to want to capitalize on prices as quickly as possible.

And, it’s no different for this year’s valuable calf crop. Producers are gearing up to cash in on their investment in producing and raising a healthy calf, but there are a few reasons to slow down and evaluate if this is the most profitable path. Could waiting a few months longer realize additional payoff?

Preconditioning cattle, which commonly includes a vaccination, nutritional and management program to help calves through a stressful timeframe, can be an investment, but it can be an investment with potentially bigger payoffs down the road.

Here are four reasons preconditioning calves makes ‘cents’:

1. Improved calf health

As many producers know, weaning can be a very stressful time for calves. Stress may cause them to go off feed, become immunocompromised and more susceptible to disease, or even result in death.

Calves that are preconditioned with an effective vaccination program and started on a high-quality nutrition program may be better equipped to handle this period of stress.

Research shows that preconditioned calves may have a significant reduction in treatment costs, as much as $29.50 per head, as well as 3.1 percent lower mortality rate in comparison to non-preconditioned calves.1 Investing in animal health with preconditioning can help cattle get through a stressful period, meaning potentially less treatment cost and more calves down the road.

2. Additional calf weight gain and increased feed efficiency

Selling calves at a later date that have gone through a preconditioning program (45 days or more) will have added weight versus calves that are sold at weaning.2 Additionally, research shows that calves that have gone through preconditioning have 7.2 percent better feed efficiency.1

Another study shows that preconditioning can add up to $61 per head to the value of heifers or $11.04 per hundredweight to the initial weaning weight.3

3. Seasonal market payoff

Preconditioning may provide an opportunity to sell calves in a more favorable market. In many instances, spring-born calves are weaned in October and are either sold at that point, or they are preconditioned to be marketed roughly 45 days later in November or December. Seasonal price indicators show that it may be more profitable to wait for higher prices in November or December, but that it varies based on market scenarios.4

Market prices for cattle can really fluctuate, and it’s important to have tabs on the market value at any given time, in comparison to what you’ll be investing in a preconditioning program. Cattle producers should always have a goal in place before starting a program.

4. Management premium

Despite the additional costs of vaccination and nutrition, research shows that conservatively, preconditioning may capture $50 to $75 per head of additional value.3 Whether you keep the set of calves on your operation for further development, or are looking to sell those calves to a stocker or feedlot operation, this added value can mean potential profit in the form of healthier animals and the resulting premiums.

When considering a preconditioning program, there are several critical management elements to keep in mind. Make sure preconditioned calves are acquainted with feed bunks and water troughs. Fresh, clean water should be offered at all times. In addition, calves should be offered a high-quality, balanced diet with the appropriate amount of energy, protein, minerals and vitamins.

Does your nutrition program stack up? Find out by visiting J & N Feed and Seed.

 

Article brought to you by Purina and Chris Forcherio, Ph.D. Beef Research Manager.


1Urban, R. & Grooms, D.L. (2012.) Prevention and control of Bovine Respiratory Disease. Journal of Livestock Science. 3:27-36. Retrieved March 16, 2015 from http://livestockscience.in/wp-content/uploads/2012/Bovine_Respiratory_Disease.pdf.

2Bailey, D. and Stenquist, N. Preconditioning calves for feedlots. Retrieved March 16, 2015 from 
3Lalman, D. and Mourer, G. Effects of preconditioning on health, performance and prices of weaned calves. Retrieved March 16, 2015 from http://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-2013/ANSI-3529web2014.pdf
4Avent, R., Ward, C. and Lalman, D. Economic value of preconditioning feeder calves. Retrieved March 16, 2015 from http://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-1969/AGEC-583web.pdf.

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