Archive for the ‘News & Updates’ Category

Weed and Brush Control

Sunday, February 27th, 2022

Weed and Brush Control products at J&N Feed and Seed in Graham, Texas.Proper weed and brush control management is one of the most cost-effective practices for range and pasture producers. Weeds cost pasture farmers and ranchers millions of dollars in lost production each year because they rob desirable forages of moisture and nutrients. This is the time of year we usually apply herbicides to our summer pastures for broadleaf weed control and a few troublesome kinds of grass. At J&N Feed and Seed, we offer a variety of herbicides for brush and weed control as well as hand-held and agricultural field sprayers from Wylie and Bell.

Pick up the following products at J&N:

  • RM43
  • Weed Free Zone
  • 2, 4-D Amine
  • PastureGard HL
  • Oryzalin
  • Sure Guard
  • Tordon RTU
  • Hi-Yield Atrazine Weed Killer
  • Weed-Out
  • Killzall
  • Roundup
  • Pramitol 25E
  • TVC Total Vegetation Control

Stop by J&N Feed and Seed and talk to the experts about weed and brush control needs.

ProFusion Drench Now at J&N Feed

Wednesday, February 2nd, 2022

ProFusion Drench significantly improves trace mineral status within 48 hrs of administration, making it ideal for stressful periods when cattle are off feedProFusion™ Drench from Zinpro Specialty Products provides a multi-day supply of essential trace minerals and other nutrients lost by cattle during weaning, shipping, receiving, vaccinating, and other times of stress when cattle are likely to go off feed. Formulated with patented ProPath® performance minerals, ProFusion Drench significantly improves trace mineral status within 48 hours of administration, making it ideal for stressful periods when cattle are prone to go off feed.

ProFusion Drench is available without a prescription at J&N Feed and Seed. Stop by and talk to us about your cattle operation. We’re here to help.  Click here to view the product information sheet.

 

February Garden Tips

Wednesday, February 2nd, 2022

February Garden Tips

February Garden Tips  Keep in mind that the average last freeze for North Texas area is not until mid-March. Even so, many plants normally begin to show Keep in mind that the average last freeze for North Texas area is not until mid-March. Even so, many plants normally begin to show signs of growth in February, which makes it the perfect time, to get outside and work in the yard.

 

Pruning is both an art and a necessary maintenance function. Most trees and shrubs can be lightly pruned at any time; however mid-w

inter is generally the best time for major pruning.

Summer flowering trees and shrubs should be pruned before buds begin to swell for Spring, generally they bloom on new growth; examples are crape myrtle, butterfly bush, spiraea and honeysuckle. If those seed heads on crepe myrtles bother you, remove them this month. Just clip back the ends of the branches, do not destroy the beauty of the gracefully sculptured trunks by severe pruning. Please never top a crape myrtle.

 Spring flowering plants such as azalea, Carolina jessamine, wisteria, forsythia, and quince should not be pruned until after the blooms are spent.

February is the best time for pruning most roses. Remove any old and diseased canes then cut the remaining canes back by 50%. Make your cuts above a bud that faces away from the center of the plant.

Early to mid-February marks the time to apply a pre-emergent herbicide for lawns. These products kill germinating seed. A second application may be needed in late May or early June. Remember that the best defense against lawn weeds is a healthy, thick turf resulting from good management.

Trim back perennials and ornamental grasses before the new growth appears in Spring. Clean up around plants and mulch well to protect.

Thinking about a spring garden? Look for onion sets and seed potatoes, they arrive early. By planting early, plants will be off to a better start and can become adjusted before the stresses of summer arrive.

Apply Pre-Emergents for Spring Weed Control

Wednesday, February 2nd, 2022

Apply pre emergents for spring weed control. Pick up diminsion and gallery pre emergents at J&N Feed and Seed in Graham, Texas.

Regardless of what the groundhog says, spring is right around the corner and it’s time to think about spring weed control.  With the mild winter, we’ve had, it’s time to apply pre-emergent for your yard. You have about a six-week window to apply pre-emergents, from the first of February to the middle of March.  There are three factors that will determine when a seed will germinate: soil temperature, moisture, and sunlight. The pre-emergent must be applied and active BEFORE that magic moment of germination occurs.

At J&N, we’ve got several products we recommend for weed control:

Synthetic Pre-Emergents

Hi-Yield Turf & Ornamental Weed and Grass Stopper – Contain dimension pre-emergent, which provides superior control of crabgrass as well as control or suppression of other listed weeds when applied before they germinate. It also provides post-emergent control of crabgrass only and is effective on crabgrass up to four weeks after it has germinated and emerged. Do not apply this product later than four weeks after crabgrass has germinated. The12# bag covers 3,000 sq ft and the 35# bag that covers 10,000 square feet.

A-Vert Plus Lawn Food 18-0-12 –  Contains Gallery and Team, pre-emergent herbicides for control of annual grasses and broadleaf weeds in established home lawns. Apply only twice per year for effective dandelion and crabgrass control. A 12lb bag covers up to 2,000 square feet.

Weed Free Zone – Controls over 80 of the toughest-to-control broadleaf weeds including Clover, Ground Ivy, Spurge, Chickweed, Dandelion, Henbit, Oxalis, Poison Ivy, Purslane, Shepherds Purse, Thistle, Virginia Buttonweed, Wild Onion and many others listed on the label. Formulated for cooler weather, it’s a great first application of the season pre-emergent.

Organic Pre-Emergent

Corn Gluten Meal – An all-natural option for weed control is corn gluten meal. It is available in both granulated and powder form and it is applied at a rate of 20 pounds per 1,000 square feet.

The key to success with these products is to apply the correct amount to your lawn.  Follow the label directions and know the square footage of your lawn.

 

Pruning Crape Myrtle Trees

Monday, January 31st, 2022
Pruning Crape Myrtle Trees. Variations of Crape Myrtle Trees in winter..

Never cap your crape myrtle trees. Above – the wrong way. Below – leave them as trees.

A touchy topic is pruning crape myrtle trees.  Do you prune them? When and how much?

The best time to prune is late winter, February – March.  The goal is to enhance the trees natural form, don’t force it to grow in a small space or prune it into an artificial shape.  Crape myrtles naturally grow as small upright or vase shaped trees with multiple trunks. A well pruned crape myrtle will have the trunks grow upward and outward. Additionally, the branches should fan out rather than growing inward into the center of the tree.

Remove crossing and inward growing branches.

To determine if your crape myrtle needs to be pruned, examine the direction in which the trunks and branches grow. Starting at ground level, follow the trunks upward to where they begin to branch. Focus on the interior of the tree rather than the outer edges. Branches that grow into the center of the tree, crossing over other branches or trunks, should be removed.

To remove a branch, follow it back to where it joins a larger branch or trunk. Take a close look at the point where the branch joins the trunk. You will notice at the point where the two join the branch is swollen or enlarged. This area is known as the branch collar. Using a pruning saw, remove the branch by cutting just above the branch collar rather than flush with the trunk. If the branch was removed at the correct place the branch collar left behind will extend out a centimeter or two from the trunk.

The wrong way to prune.

A misconception that crape myrtles need to be severely cut back in late winter or early spring in order to flower well in summer has led to the unhealthy practice of topping these plants. If necessary, crape myrtles can be reduced in height without being topped.

Topping (buck horning or de-horning) or “crape murder” involves cutting stems back at an arbitrarily chosen height rather than pruning back to a bud, side branch, or main stem. Topping trees and shrubs is harmful in many ways and regarded as an unacceptable practice by trained horticulturists and arborists.   Research shows that stem decay significantly increases when topping cuts are made, and that more dead branches also occur within the canopy.  The trees are more prone to disease as well with topping.

 

Tree Pruning Tips

Thursday, January 13th, 2022

It's pruning season, right?  That depends on what we are talking about. Read our Tree Pruning Tips and find out what and when to prune!It’s pruning season, right?  That depends on what we are talking about. Read our Tree Pruning Tips and find out what and when to prune!

It IS the season to prune hardwood trees such as black walnut, red oak, and white oak.  If you are ready to get out there and prune, but all means, get at it!  Here are some pruning tips:

  • Start at the top and work down. Assist the central leader by assuring its tip or apical bud is taller (higher) than any other leaders or branches that are competing for dominance. Totally remove or at least tip-prune any competitive leaders.
  • Remove no more than one-third of the tree canopy in any single year season. The key to a healthy root system is a healthy crown. If you remove too much of the tree’s ability to make food, root growth will suffer and set the stage for reduced crown growth the following year, which will lead to reduced root growth.
  • Do not prune flat to the stem. Instead, make an angled cut just outside of the branch collar (the donut-shaped growth surrounding the branches’ attachment to the tree) so that the wound is about the same diameter as the branch. Do not leave stubs.

Crape Myrtle Trees – don’t murder them! 

The best time to prune Crape Myrtle trees is late winter, February – March.  The goal is to enhance the tree’s natural form, don’t force it to grow in a small space or prune it into an artificial shape. Crape myrtles naturally grow as small upright or vase-shaped trees with multiple trunks. A well-pruned crape myrtle will have the trunks grow upward and outward, with branches fanning out rather than growing inward into the center of the tree.

The wrong way to prune. A misconception that Crape Myrtles need to be severely cut back in late winter or early spring in order to flower well in summer has led to the unhealthy practice of topping these plants. If necessary, Crape Myrtles can be reduced in height without being topped.

Topping (buck horning or dehorning) or “crape murder” involves cutting stems back at an arbitrarily chosen height rather than pruning back to a bud, side branch, or main stem. Topping trees and shrubs are harmful in many ways and regarded as an unacceptable practice by trained horticulturists and arborists.   Research shows that stem decay significantly increases when topping cuts are made and that more dead branches also occur within the canopy.  The trees are more prone to disease as well with topping.

Fruit Trees – NOT YET! 

WAIT…until the last hard freeze.  We need to wait until winter is almost over and spring is fast approaching. Since our average first frost-free day in Texas is around March 15, this month can be thought of as our early spring month. The best time to prune is late January through February.

Plants that bloom in early spring with the appearance of new leaves should be pruned after they flower. Those that bloom later in the spring or summer should be pruned during the dormant season in January or February.

Have any questions about our tree pruning tips?  Let us know.  We are here to help.

 

 

Tips For Planting Seed Potatoes

Tuesday, January 4th, 2022

Tips for planting seed potatoes from J&N Feed and Seed in Graham, Texas.Onion sets and seed potatoes arrive mid-January at J&N Feed and Seed. Planting seed potatoes and onions are at the top of everyone’s gardening list this time of year. As everyone in North Texas knows, our late January and February weather can be a gamble— temps can be spring-like one day and fall below freezing the next.  But, the weather extremes should not deter gardeners from planting during these months.  Potatoes are top of the list for planting this time of year.

Other good go-to cold weather vegetables are root produce such as turnips, beets, and carrots as well as hardy leafy greens like spinach, cabbage, kale, and chard. Bulb veggies (onions and garlic), as well as asparagus crowns, can also be planted at this time.

Preparing and Planting Potatoes 

When purchasing seed potatoes, look for certified seed potatoes. These are seeding potatoes that have not been treated with growth retardants to prevent sprouting. Conventional potatoes in grocery markets are typically treated with retardants.

After you have planned and prepared a garden spot with well-drained, loose soil, the seed potatoes can be prepped for planting:

Cut each seed potato into quarters (sulfur dust can be applied to the fresh cut ends) and let the potato quarters set out overnight or longer until cut sides callus over.  Seed potato quarters are then ready to plant— for a good rule of thumb, potato quarters should be planted 3” to 4” deep and spaced 12” to 15” apart. To provide plants plenty of growing room, make sure rows are spaced 24” to 36” apart.

Caring for Potato Plants

Potatoes need consistent moisture, so water regularly when tubers start to form.  Before the potato plants bloom, hilling should be done when the plant is about 6 inches tall. Hoe the dirt up around the base of the plant in order to cover the root as well as to support the plant. Bury the plant base in loose soil. Hilling will keep the potato plants from getting sunburned, in which case they turn green and will taste bitter.  You will need to hill potatoes every couple of weeks to protect your crop.

When the potato plants have bloomed, new potatoes are ready for harvest.  For larger potatoes, harvest only after plant tops has fallen over. For more information on planting seed potatoes, visit the Texas A&M website.

Other Cool Weather Vegetable Plantings

Lettuce, spinach, and cabbage can be planted at this time either by seeds or plant starts. For reference, these vegetables can be planted in February with seed or starter plants.

Stop by J&N for your seed potatoes, onion sets, and other cool-weather vegetables.

2022 Young County Jr. Livestock Show

Monday, January 3rd, 2022

The 2022 Young County Jr. Livestock Show kicks off  Wednesday, January 12, through Saturday, January 15, 2022,  in the Main Arena of the Young County Arena.The 2022 Young County Jr. Livestock Show kicks off  Wednesday, January 12, 2022, and runs through Saturday, January 15, 2022,  in the Main Arena of the Young County Arena. Come out and show your support for our local kids at this great event.

Before you head to the arena, stop by J&N Feed and Seed for Sullivan Show Supplies, show feeds by Lindner, Moorman, Honor Show Chow, shavings, and more. Let our experts help you raise a winner in the ring this show season. Good luck to everyone showing this year!

LocationYoung County Arena – 120 Barclay Blvd. Graham, TX

Date: Wednesday, January 12th  through Saturday, January 15, 2022

Click here for the 2022 Young County Jr. Livestock Show Schedule of Events.

Click here for driving directions to Young County Arena.

Prepare For Freezing Weather With Products From J&N

Saturday, January 1st, 2022

prepare for freezing weather

Prepare for freezing weather with frost cloth, heat lamps, pipe wraps, deicers, pine shavings, and MORE at J&N Feed and Seed.

With freezing temperatures fast approaching, don’t be caught off guard. J&N Feed and Seed is your one-stop-shop for freeze protection this winter.  We carry a variety of products that will protect your pipes, landscaping, stock tanks, and even bird feeders from the threat of a freeze.

  • Ice & Snow Melt by Zero Ice Melt –  An effective and proven ice melter that will beat any other products on the market.
  • Portable Heaters by Mr. Heater – Heat a small space our your entire garage or workshop. We’ve got a size to fit your needs.
  • Pipe Wraps and Faucet Covers – Wrap pipes nearest exterior walls and in crawl spaces with pipe insulation or heating tape to protect exposed pipes and faucets.  Perfect to wrap exposed pool equipment!
  • Pipe Heating Cables-heating Cable prevents frozen water pipes to –50ºF. Wrap exposed pipes and faucets to protect against freezing pipes.
  • Heat Lamps & Bulbs– use anywhere to provide extra warmth.
  • Stock Tank & Bucket Deicers– keep your stock tank from freezing.  We carry floating and sinking deicers.
  • Pet Bowl & Bird Bath Deicers – Make sure water freshwater is available for our outdoor pets and wild birds during the freezing winter months.
  • Pine Shavings – keep your outdoor animals warm with warm, dry shavings.
  • Frost Cloth & Burlap  – protect your delicate landscaping and tropical trees. We’ve got traditional brown and camo burlap.
  • Frost Blankets – protect your tender garden and landscaping vegetation.

Stop by J&N Feed and Seed and let us help you be ready for the cold weather ahead! A little preparation now can save you time and money with the weather dips below 32 degrees!

Four Reasons for Preconditioning Calves

Saturday, January 1st, 2022

Preconditioning calves is one way that a farm or ranch can really add value, whether those cattle are staying on the farm or moving into a stocker or feedlot scenario. The producer implementing a preconditioning program may receive a higher premium. No matter where the calf goes after that, the opportunity for improved health and performance should be adding value from that program.

In times of high cattle prices, it’s not uncommon for producers to want to capitalize on prices as quickly as possible.

And, it’s no different for this year’s valuable calf crop. Producers are gearing up to cash in on their investment in producing and raising a healthy calf, but there are a few reasons to slow down and evaluate if this is the most profitable path. Could waiting a few months longer realize additional payoff?

Preconditioning cattle, which commonly includes a vaccination, nutritional and management program to help calves through a stressful timeframe, can be an investment, but it can be an investment with potentially bigger payoffs down the road.

Here are four reasons preconditioning calves makes ‘cents’:

1. Improved calf health

As many producers know, weaning can be a very stressful time for calves. Stress may cause them to go off feed, become immunocompromised and more susceptible to disease, or even result in death.

Calves that are preconditioned with an effective vaccination program and started on a high-quality nutrition program may be better equipped to handle this period of stress.

Research shows that preconditioned calves may have a significant reduction in treatment costs, as much as $29.50 per head, as well as 3.1 percent lower mortality rate in comparison to non-preconditioned calves.1 Investing in animal health with preconditioning can help cattle get through a stressful period, meaning potentially less treatment cost and more calves down the road.

2. Additional calf weight gain and increased feed efficiency

Selling calves at a later date that have gone through a preconditioning program (45 days or more) will have added weight versus calves that are sold at weaning.2 Additionally, research shows that calves that have gone through preconditioning have 7.2 percent better feed efficiency.1

Another study shows that preconditioning can add up to $61 per head to the value of heifers or $11.04 per hundredweight to the initial weaning weight.3

3. Seasonal market payoff

Preconditioning may provide an opportunity to sell calves in a more favorable market. In many instances, spring-born calves are weaned in October and are either sold at that point, or they are preconditioned to be marketed roughly 45 days later in November or December. Seasonal price indicators show that it may be more profitable to wait for higher prices in November or December, but that it varies based on market scenarios.4

Market prices for cattle can really fluctuate, and it’s important to have tabs on the market value at any given time, in comparison to what you’ll be investing in a preconditioning program. Cattle producers should always have a goal in place before starting a program.

4. Management premium

Despite the additional costs of vaccination and nutrition, research shows that conservatively, preconditioning may capture $50 to $75 per head of additional value.3 Whether you keep the set of calves on your operation for further development, or are looking to sell those calves to a stocker or feedlot operation, this added value can mean potential profit in the form of healthier animals and the resulting premiums.

When considering a preconditioning program, there are several critical management elements to keep in mind. Make sure preconditioned calves are acquainted with feed bunks and water troughs. Fresh, clean water should be offered at all times. In addition, calves should be offered a high-quality, balanced diet with the appropriate amount of energy, protein, minerals and vitamins.

Does your nutrition program stack up? Find out by visiting J & N Feed and Seed.

 

Article brought to you by Purina and Chris Forcherio, Ph.D. Beef Research Manager.


1Urban, R. & Grooms, D.L. (2012.) Prevention and control of Bovine Respiratory Disease. Journal of Livestock Science. 3:27-36. Retrieved March 16, 2015 from http://livestockscience.in/wp-content/uploads/2012/Bovine_Respiratory_Disease.pdf.

2Bailey, D. and Stenquist, N. Preconditioning calves for feedlots. Retrieved March 16, 2015 from 
3Lalman, D. and Mourer, G. Effects of preconditioning on health, performance and prices of weaned calves. Retrieved March 16, 2015 from http://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-2013/ANSI-3529web2014.pdf
4Avent, R., Ward, C. and Lalman, D. Economic value of preconditioning feeder calves. Retrieved March 16, 2015 from http://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-1969/AGEC-583web.pdf.

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