Archive for the ‘Garden’ Category

Railroad Ties Back In-Stock

Monday, July 6th, 2020

Railroad ties available at J&N Feed and Seed in Graham, TX. Looking for railroad ties for your next outdoor project? Look no further than J&N Feed and Seed. We’ve got them in-stock at J&N Feed. Railroad ties lend a raw, natural beauty to any landscaping project. Ties can be used as functional elements or for decorative accents. Construct beautiful fences, corrals, chutes, steps, retaining walls, flower boxes, borders, and walkways with ties. Use ties for construction applications instead of brick, cinder block, or synthetic materials. Ties can also be used in combination with other materials to create a variety of attractive textures and designs.  # 1-grade rail road ties are the best-used ties you can buy, with three good, solid sides and moderate imperfection. Come see us for all your landscaping needs.

Why Stake Tomatoes?

Sunday, May 17th, 2020

StakingTomatoesYour tomato plants are in the ground, the weather is warming up and the plants are growing! What’s next? While not all tomato plants need to be supported, most will benefit from it unless you are growing dwarf or short bush varieties of plants. For tomatoes that will grow to taller heights, we recommend that you take the time to stake them. While it does take some extra work there are many benefits:

  • It saves space in your garden. You can grow more plants in the surrounding area.
  • It helps keep them clean, avoid rot and disease.
  • You’ll get an earlier harvest with larger tomatoes.
  • It’s easier to pick the tomatoes and work around staked plants.

How to Stake

When you stake a tomato plant, try to put the stake on the prevailing downwind side so the plant will lean against it when the wind is blowing hard.

Six-to eight-foot-high stakes are good for most tomatoes, although you can make do with shorter four- to five-foot stakes, if necessary. Put the stakes in the ground right after you’ve set out the plants. Drive them about a foot into the soil, three to five inches away from the plant. Remember not to put the stake on the root side of trench-planted tomatoes. As the plant grows, tie a strip of cloth, nylon stocking or coated wire tightly to the stake and loosely around the plant in a figure-eight fashion. Leave at least an inch or two of slack. Add more ties as needed as the plant grows up the stake.

 

Stop by our store for your gardening supplies. We options available for your plants including stakes, circular cages or trellises. We also have fertilizer, hoses and everything you need to keep your garden growing!

 

 

Beekeeping Supplies From Little Giants

Friday, May 1st, 2020

Beekeeping Supplies From Little Giants at J&N Feed and Seed in Graham, Texas.Beekeeping Supplies from Little Giants are available at select J&N Feed and Seed.

If you can start a garden, you can raise bees and we can help! Considering all the buzz about beekeeping right now, you might be thinking of jumping in and starting your own hive. As you would when with bringing a new animal to your farm or home, it can be tough to know whether you’ll eventually regret your decision addition or celebrate it. So with this mind, what does it take to keep bees? Before you jump into beekeeping, here are a few points to consider: the right questions to ask, the equipment you’ll need, and, finally, how to choose the right bees.

Should you keep bees?

Check your local ordinances for keeping bees to make sure there are no restrictions in your area for beekeeping. Obviously, bees should be kept away from outdoor areas frequented for outdoor activity or recreation. Also, make sure you and your family members or anyone who would be living near the bees does not have any known allergic reactions to bee stings. This issue alone is probably the deal breaker if you or a family member have any reactions to insect stings.

Why Keep Bees?

Of course, collecting honey the bees produce is the obvious goal, but there’s a little more to beekeeping than producing honey. Beekeeping is good for your garden and crops, too. They help pollinate vegetables and flowers and may help your yields.

Honey, honeybees, beeswax, and other bee-related products like propolis tincture and beeswax-based beauty products can be a great supplement to a homestead or farm income and can even form the basis of your farm’s business. Many small farmers find bees to be a rewarding and productive means of income. Beekeeping may qualify for an agricultural exemption on property taxes under Texas law. To learn more about beekeeping in Texas, go to the Texas Beekeepers Association website here.

Little Giant Beekeeping Supplies are available at J&N Feed and Seed in Graham, Texas.

Time For Tomatoes

Saturday, April 4th, 2020

tomatoesApril can be a tricky month with the weather here in Texas. This year we had some cold nights in March, so you may have delayed your tomato planting. In order to get a nice summer harvest we recommend getting them planted soon. But if you’ve delayed until mid-April, here are some tips:

Which varieties are best? Choose your varieties carefully. With a late planting date, it becomes most important that you avoid the huge types like Big Boy, Beefsteak and others. They simply aren’t going to set fruit when temperatures climb above 90. There’s some type of physiological issue that prevents them from doing so, and that same problem stops fruit set when it’s below 70 degrees at night. You’ll be doing well to get five or six fruits from these types that were bred for the Midwest.

Thanks to seed company mergers and the ongoing quest for something new, you’ll also find many of your old favorite tomato varieties are no longer available. Carnival, Merced and 444 are just a few of the types that have disappeared from the market.

What are the best types? Small to mid-sized fruit. In order of increasing size, your shopping list should include Red Cherry, Red or Yellow Pear, Sweet 100 and other super-sweet types, Porter, Roma, Super Fantastic and Celebrity. Look for stout transplants in 4-inch pots. They should be 6 to 8 inches tall, and they need to be toughened to withstand sunlight and wind. If you’ve already planted tomatoes, and if you don’t have any of these smaller types, you still have time to add a few in.

 How should I prepare the soil? Set your plants into well-prepared garden soil to which you have added several inches of organic matter (compost, pine bark mulch, rotted manure and sphagnum peat moss, among others). Plant in beds that have been raised by 5 or 6 inches to ensure good drainage should we have extended periods of rainy weather. Set the plants out 42 to 48 inches apart in rows that are 60 inches apart. If you have transplants that are slightly leggy, dig a shallow trench for each plant and plant it at a 45-degree angle. It will form adventitious roots along the portion of the stem that you plant below grade. Water the plants as soon as you have them all set out.

 What are some key points for growing? Keep the plants off the ground as they begin to grow. Cages you can buy in stores are usually too small for Texas tomato plants. Your plants would probably grow up and out of them before you really started to harvest your crop. It’s much better, instead, to put 5-foot-tall wire cages around every plant. Concrete reinforcing wire works best. Cut it into 54-inch lengths, so that each cage will be approximately 17 inches in diameter. Allow all the “suckers” (branches) to develop, and keep them pushed back within the cages. They will shade the ripening tomatoes and protect them from sunscald.

You can also grow tomatoes in patio pots, as long as they’re large enough to allow normal root growth. In most cases, that will mean 7- or 10-gallon pots, and you’ll want to fill them with a lightweight, highly organic potting soil. Remember that potted tomato plants will dry out much more quickly than their in-ground counterparts, so prepare to water them frequently. Tomatoes that are allowed to wilt badly, whether in pots or in the ground, will typically develop blossom-end rot. The ends of the fruits away from the stems will have brown, sunken spots that will ruin the fruit quality completely.

What about pests? The prime pests of spring tomatoes, in order of their appearance, will be aphids, early blight and spider mites. Aphids are already showing up. They’re small pear-shaped insects that congregate on the newest growth. They’re not the worst pests you might encounter, but you’ll still want to keep them washed off with a hard stream of water. You can also eliminate them with most general-purpose insecticides that are labeled for vegetables.

Early blight usually shows up in mid-May. Thumbprint-sized, bright yellow blotches show up on the bottom-most leaves. Left unchecked, it then spreads up the stems. Keep the foliage as dry as you can, and apply a labeled fungicide to stop its spread. When grooming your plants, take care not to carry the fungal spores to healthy plants via your hands.

Spider mites typically appear about three weeks after you see early blight, so that usually means mid-June in our part of Texas. Lower leaves will have fine light tan mottling, and the discoloration will quickly spread up the stems. By the time you see fine webs between the leaves, you will have waited too long. If you want to confirm early outbreaks, thump a suspect leaf over a sheet of white paper. If you see tiny specks starting to move about freely, those are the mites. Most general-purpose insecticides will offer some degree of control.

Source: Neil Sperry, Time for Tomatoes

Fire Ant Control Starts Now!

Wednesday, April 1st, 2020

ON07-Over-n-Out-23lb-rendering

Spring marks the beginning of fire ant season, when warm weather and frequent rains brings the ants above ground where they build dirt mounds that dot the Texas landscape like a terrestrial pox.  For us here in the Lone Star State, fire ant season can stretch well into fall. These little red pests may look harmless, but their bites can be devastating, as they sometimes overwhelm and kill newborn livestock, wildlife and can even cause anaphylactic shock to some humans.

Fire ants can re-infest from long distances and the reproductive potential is great, so it is important to treat not only the mound, but also the surrounding areas in your yard to stay ahead of them! At J&N Feed, we’ve got two options for fire ant control. Treating early and often is the key to controlling these pests.

Over’N Out! Advanced – Stop the fire ants early with Over’N Out! Advanced fire ant killer from GardenTech. The deep-penetrating and odorless formula kills the pesky pest and their queen. Treat the mounds to kill fire ants fast, then apply the ready to use granules to your yard Fire Ant Controlto prevent new mounds for 6 months. The 11.5 lb. bag covers up to 5000 sq. ft.

Hi-Yield Fire Ant Control may be used in a variety of exterior settings include fields, pastures, recreational, residential and landscaped turf, for excellent control of fire ants. To get the best results, apply the product around dawn or dusk, because that is when the ants are most active.

Fresh Vegetable Plants, Perennials and Hanging Baskets – Greehouse

Wednesday, April 1st, 2020

Vegetable plants now instock at J and N Feed and Seed in Graham, TXYou know it’s Springtime with the fresh vegetable plants arrive! Our greenhouse is fully stocked with fresh plants for this time of year! We carry a variety of vegetable plants including squash, zucchini, peppers, tomatoes and much more. We also carry select locally grown vegetables, heirloom vegetables, perennials, and beautiful hanging baskets as well.  Prefer to start your garden from seeds? We’ve got a great selection garden seeds in regular and organic varieties.

Make J&N Feed and Seed your one stop for all your garden supplies including mulch, fertilizer, compost, seeds (including organic), and plants! Looking to plant an organic garden or raised bed garden? We can help! We carry a variety of organic garden options. Stop by J&N Feed and Seed this Spring to speak with our Garden Experts!

Apply Pre-Emergents for Spring Weed Control

Monday, February 3rd, 2020

Apply pre emergents for spring weed control. Pick up diminsion and gallery pre emergents at J&N Feed and Seed in Graham, Texas.

Regardless of what the groundhog says, spring is right around the corner and it’s time to think about spring weed control.  With the mild winter, we’ve had, it’s time to apply pre-emergent for your yard. You have about a six-week window to apply pre-emergents, from the first of February to the middle of March.  There are three factors that will determine when a seed will germinate: soil temperature, moisture, and sunlight. The pre-emergent must be applied and active BEFORE that magic moment of germination occurs.

At J&N, we’ve got several products we recommend for weed control:

Synthetic Pre-Emergents

Hi-Yield Turf & Ornamental Weed and Grass Stopper – Contain dimension pre-emergent, which provides superior control of crabgrass as well as control or suppression of other listed weeds when applied before they germinate. It also provides post-emergent control of crabgrass only and is effective on crabgrass up to four weeks after it has germinated and emerged. Do not apply this product later than four weeks after crabgrass has germinated. The12# bag covers 3,000 sq ft and the 35# bag that covers 10,000 square feet.

A-Vert Plus Lawn Food 18-0-12 –  Contains Gallery and Team, pre-emergent herbicides for control of annual grasses and broadleaf weeds in established home lawns. Apply only twice per year for effective dandelion and crabgrass control. A 12lb bag covers up to 2,000 square feet.

Weed Free Zone – Controls over 80 of the toughest-to-control broadleaf weeds including Clover, Ground Ivy, Spurge, Chickweed, Dandelion, Henbit, Oxalis, Poison Ivy, Purslane, Shepherds Purse, Thistle, Virginia Buttonweed, Wild Onion and many others listed on the label. Formulated for cooler weather, it’s a great first application of the season pre-emergent.

Organic Pre-Emergent

Corn Gluten Meal – An all-natural option for weed control is corn gluten meal. It is available in both granulated and powder form and it is applied at a rate of 20 pounds per 1,000 square feet.

The key to success with these products is to apply the correct amount to your lawn.  Follow the label directions and know the square footage of your lawn.

 

Pick Up Spring Onions & Seed Potatoes at J&N

Saturday, February 1st, 2020

Pick up spring onions & seed potatoes at J&N Feed and Seed. We’ve got a  variety of spring onions & seed potatoes in-stock and ready for your garden. We’ll have a good selection of Cole Crops arriving mid-February so keep an eye on Facebook and we’ll let you know when they’ve arrived.

Onions & seed potatoes at J&N Feed and Seed in Graham, TexasJ&N Onion Varieties

  • 1015-Sweet Onion  – A giant yellow onion with a super sweet taste. Onions can grow as large as softballs—and store well for 2-3 months.
  •  Georgia Sweet (Yellow Granex) – Sweet as an apple” is the expression used to describe its mild flavor.
  • White Granex – It is a white version of the popular Yellow Granex hybrid
  • Burgundy Red – Produces colorful, 4 in. wide onions that have red skins with a white & pink interior. It has a mild, sweet flavor.

February is the time to get your onions sets in the ground. Read more about planting onion sets here.

J&N Potato Varieties

Onions & Seed Potatoes at J&N Feed and Seed in Graham, Texas

  • Kennebec Seed Potatoes – Thin, smooth skin and flesh make these oval potatoes an all-purpose pantry staple.
  • La Soda Seed Potatoes –  A distinctive rosy skin and waxy white flesh. Widely adapted and reliable withstands cold, heat and drought.

Tips For Planting Potatoes

When purchasing seed potatoes, look for certified seed potatoes. These are seeding potatoes which have not been treated with growth retardants to prevent sprouting.

After you have planned and prepared a garden spot with well-drained, loose soil, the seed potatoes can be prepped for planting:

Cut each seed potato into quarters (sulfur dust can be applied to the fresh cut ends) and let the potato quarters set out overnight or longer until cut sides callus over. Seed potato quarters are then ready to plant— for a good rule of thumb, potato quarters should be planted 3” to 4” deep and spaced 12” to 15” apart. To provide plants plenty of growing room, make sure rows are spaced 24” to 36” apart.

7 Plants That Need Winter Pruning

Thursday, December 5th, 2019

Between now and mid-February Texas winter pruninggardeners should begin winter pruning.  Neal Sperry offers this list of plants that should be pruned during this time of year.

  • Shade trees:  remove damaged or dead branches (pruning sealant only on oak cuts). All cuts should be flush with the branch collar on the trunk.
  • Evergreen shrubs: prune to maintain natural growth form of your evergreen shrubs.
  • Peach and plum trees:  prune to remove the vertical growth and keep plants low and from spreading.
  • Grapes: for those that grow grapes, remove as much as 80 to 85 percent of cane growth.
  • Summer-flowering shrubs and vines: prune damaged or excessive branches. Do not top your crape myrtle plants.
  • Prune dead stems and leaves from perennials to tidy up your garden beds.
  • Prune freeze-damaged stems from plants hurt by December cold. (Could include gardenias, oleanders, bottlebrush, pittosporum, depending on where you live in Texas.)

Spend the time now to prune and care for your trees and plants, it will pay off in the spring.  Looking for garden supplies?  Come visit our store!

Sandbur Control With Prowl H20 & ECGrow

Saturday, March 2nd, 2019

sandbur controlIt’s time to map out your sandbur control plan for your pasture and lawn. Here’s a good rule of thumb to follow: if you had a sandbur problem last year and were unable to control it, there is a good probability it will be back this year. The way to control sandbur that is already established is to use pre-emergent herbicides. This must be done in early spring before the soil temperature reaches 52 degrees Fahrenheit and seeds germinate. A second application should be put down in June. At J&N Feed and Seed, we recommend Prowl H20 pre-emergent and ECGrow for the control and prevention of sandbur.

Like all pre-emergents, Prowl H20 must be applied before the sandbur emerges. In southern Oklahoma and northern Texas, the most common application time is February or early March before the grasses break dormancy.  Rainfall must occur within two weeks of application or efficacy will be reduced dramatically. Please note, there is a 60-day haying restriction and a 45-day grazing restriction when using Prowl H2O.

If you miss your window for applying the pre-emergent for sandbur control, come see us for post-emergent solutions to your sandbur problem. Let our educated experts help map out your pasture-management plan today.

 

 

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