Archive for the ‘Chicks’ Category

Purina True Choice Poultry Feed

Tuesday, April 30th, 2019

Purina True Choice Poultry Feed is now available at J&N Feed and Seed.  True Choice layer pellets, crumbles and starter/grower feed is a budget-friendly alternative to our premium line of poultry feed. It provides complete nutrition for broilers and layers, with no cheap fillers or by-products!

  • Layer 16 Crumble 
  • Layer 16 Pellet
  • Poultry Starter/Grower 18 Crumbles

If your flock is ready to make the switch to layer feed, give Purina True Choice 16% Layer Pellet or Crumble a try. Layer feeds are designed to provide optimum nutrition for birds laying eggs for consumption. Layer feeds contain 16% protein and has increased levels of Calcium, for proper shell development. Not sure when to start your girls on layer feed? Layer feeds should be fed starting around 18-20 weeks of age, or when the first egg is laid, whichever comes first.

Guaranteed Analysis: Layer 16

  • Crude Protein (MIN) 16%
  • Lysine (MIN) 0.70%
  • Methionine (MIN) .30%
  • Crude Fat (MIN) 1.50%
  • Crude Fiber (MAX) 10.00%
  • Calcium (MIN) 3.50% (MAX) 4.50%
  • Phosphorus (MIN) 0.40%
  • Salt (MIN) 0.15% (MAX) .65%
  • Phytase* (A.Oryzae)(MIN) 227 FYT/lb

Guaranteed Analysis: Grower 18

  • Crude Protein (MIN) 18%
  • Lysine (MIN) 0.90%
  • Methionine (MIN) .33%
  • Crude Fat (MIN) 2.50%
  • Crude Fiber (MAX) 7.00%
  • Calcium (MIN) .75% (MAX) 1.25%
  • Phosphorus (MIN) 0.50%
  • Salt (MIN) 0.15% (MAX) .75%
  • Phytase* (A.Oryzae)(MIN) 227 FYT/lb

Pick Up Spring Chicks In April

Monday, March 25th, 2019
Apr
3
Apr
10

 

 

Spring chicks arrive at J&N Feed and Seed on April 3rd and April 10th. All chicks are pullets and sell for $2.85 each.

April 3rd chick breeds:

  • Rhode Island Reds
  • Buff Orphingtons

April 10th chick breeds:

  • Red Sex Links
  • Barred Rocks

Looking for a different breed of chicks? We can help. Stop by and special order chicks with us. Get all your baby chick and chicken supplies at J&N Feed and Seed! We have chicken feed, feeders, fencing, waterers, heat lamps and more!

6-8 Week Old Chicks

Thursday, March 14th, 2019

chickdaysgraphicpurinaKeeping 6-8 Week Old Chicks

Between 6 and 8 weeks of age, your chicks will be much larger and will need twice the amount of floor space they started with. It’s also time to start thinking about moving your chicks from the brooder to more permanent living quarters outside. If the temperature is mild and the chicks are fully feathered, they can be allowed outside during the day. If you purchased straight-run chicks (50/50 males and females) you may be able to distinguish the males from the females around 5 to 7 weeks of age. The combs and wattles of the males usually develop earlier and are usually (but not always) larger than in the females. Females are typically smaller in size than males. If you are still uncertain of their sex by appearance, you’ll be sure who the males in the flock are when you hear them attempting to crow.

Things to do with your chickens at this stage

Your chicks are able to regulate their body temperature by this time and should not need a heat source any longer unless the outside temperatures are still very cold. Keep temperature at 65°F if this is the case.

Prepare your chicken house or coop. Housing should provide approximately three to four square feet of space per mature bird and should contain sufficient feeders and waterers to accommodate your flock size so that all birds can eat and drink at the same time. Two to three inches of litter should be put down to minimize dampness and odor. A nest box for every four hens should be made available for laying pullets. Roosts can be considered for laying pullets but not recommended for meat birds because of the potential for developing breast blisters.

If possible, prepare an area outside the coop for your birds. Outside runs or fenced in areas will allow chickens to scratch and peck to their hearts desire, returning to the roost at dusk to sleep. The house needs to have a secure latch that is fastened each night if they are allowed outside during the day. An outside run attached to the coop with screening on the top and sides for protection will allow chickens unlimited access to the yard and save you time and worry.

Tips to grow on

Once you move your birds to their permanent residence, make sure they are protected from predators, especially at night. Even a latched door may not be secure enough to keep raccoons out.

  • Your birds are still growing so keep feeding Purina® Start & Grow® Recipe to help them reach their maximum potential. Chicks should remain on this feed until at least 18 weeks of age.
  • If your flock is a mix of chicks, ducks and geese, continue feeding Purina® Flock Raiser Recipe.
  • Turkeys can start on Flock Raiser Sunresh® Recipe at 8 to 10 weeks of age. Keep feeding this until market weight or laying age.
  •  If chicks were purchased for meat production, the normal weight for processing is 3 to 4 pounds for broilers and 6 to 8 pounds for roasters.
Looking ahead for layers

Laying pullets will need to receive a constant amount of light exposure once they reach 16 weeks of age to promote good egg production. For optimum egg production, a maximum of 17-18 hours of light (natural and/or artificial) per day is recommended. Gradually change your layer flock over to Purina® Layena® Sunfresh® Recipe at 18 to 20 weeks of age to support egg production.

Pullets will usually begin laying between 18 and 22 weeks of age. Increasing day length in the spring stimulates normal egg production, and egg production is naturally decreased in the fall when the days get shorter. Artificial light can be used in addition to natural daylight in the fall and winter months to maintain egg production all year long. If artificial light is not used, hens will stop laying when daylight hours decrease. It is very important that the supplemental light be consistent, as even one day without supplemental lighting can cause a decrease in egg production.

After 10-14 months of egg production, hens will molt and stop laying eggs. During molting, old feathers are lost and replaced by new feathers. It usually lasts between eight and twelve weeks (though it can be shorter or longer, depending on the individual hen and her environment) and it gives the hen’s reproductive system some much needed rest. Hens will return to production after the molt. Eggs laid in the next cycle are usually larger with improved shell quality but production typically drops about 10 percent.

Source: Purina Poultry

Special Order Spring Chicks at J&N Feed

Friday, March 1st, 2019

spring chicksIt’s hard to believe it’s time for spring chicks!  J&N Feed and Seed is now accepting orders for specialty spring chicks.  Not sure what type of chick to order? Give us a call at 940-549-4631 or stop by the store and talk to us about the different breeds of chicks available.  We are happy to help!

Before you bring chicks home, make sure you’ve prepared. Raising chickens is a great experience for the whole family. One of the primary requirements is providing housing that is comfortable for your backyard flock. Young chicks can be raised in a variety of structures, but the area should be warm, dry and ventilated, but not drafty. Also, make sure it is easy to clean.

Before you bring them home:
Several days in advance, thoroughly clean and disinfect the brooder house and any equipment the chicks will use. Doing this in advance will allow everything to dry completely. Dampness is a mortal enemy to chicks, resulting in chilling and encouraging disease such as coccidiosis (parasite infection).
When the premises are dry, place 4 to 6 inches of dry litter material (wood shavings or a commercial litter) on the floor.

Warming:
Small numbers of chicks can be warmed adequately with heat lamps placed about 20 inches above the litter surface.
Bigger groups of birds in a large room, such as a shed or a garage, should have a supplemental heat source such as a brooder stove.

Feeders and Waterers
It’s important to ensure your chicks have access to fresh feed and water. Positioning the feeders and waterers along the edges of the comfort zone will:

Keep the water and feed from being overheated
Help keep water and feed cleaner (chicks milling and sleeping under the warmth source often scatter bedding and feces)
Encourage the chicks to move around and get exercise
Be sure to have plenty of fresh feed and water when the chicks arrive.

Chicken Coops From SummerHawk Ranch

Tuesday, April 17th, 2018

Start living sunny side up with new chicken coops from SummerHawk Ranch, now available at J&N Feed and Seed. We’ve brought in the Seaside Cottage Chicken Coop and the Pacific Northwest Chicken Coop so your girls can live in style!

Seaside Cottage Chicken Coop –  This design calls to mind those beautiful shoreline escapes. Includes raised coop, decorative cupola, 3 nesting boxes, roosting perch, access ladder, 2 access doors for cleaning, small planter box, 2 windows and a 20-square foot welded metal pen with one door on top and one door at the back. Includes a raised coop with decorative cupola, 3 nesting boxes, roosting perch, access ladder, 2 access doors for cleaning, small planter box, and 2 windows. The 20-square foot welded metal pen features one door on top and one door at the back for easy cleaning access. Product Dimensions: 56″ L x 33″ W x 36″ H; Pen- 66″L x 43″ W x 24″ H

Pacific Northwest Bungalow Chicken Coop  – This design embodies a natural connection to the unique climate and landscape of the area. Includes a raised coop with 3 nesting boxes, roosting perch, access ladder, 2 access doors for cleaning, small planter box, truss feature on one side and a window. The 20-square foot welded metal pen features one door on top and one door at the back for easy cleaning access.  Product Dimensions: Coop- 56″ L x 33″ W x 36″ H; Pen- 66″L x 43″ W x 24″ H.

 

Product Specifications:

  • Stronger and sturdier than competitive coops: Canadian hemlock, a harder, heavier wood is used for all structural support components; thick PVC
  • Humanely sized for happier, healthier hens: most coops are not sized according to community standards for healthy and humane chicken keeping, visit SummerHawkRanch.com/CrueltyFree to learn more
  • Industry-leading full 3-year warranty: 11 times longer than a typical 90-day limited warranty
  • Strong, safe and easy to assemble: experience our new patent-pending GrooveLock Assembly System
  • Also, great for rabbits and small pets

Chick Deliveries At J&N Feed and Seed

Tuesday, February 27th, 2018
Mar ’18
13
12:00 pm
Mar ’18
22
12:00 pm

It’s chick season and we’ve got 2 chick deliveries coming up in March at J&N Feed and Seed.  Spring chicks arrive on March 13th and March 22nd. Chicks will be available by noon on the dates listed. We recommend calling the store before you head over to confirm delivery. All baby chicks are pullets, 90% accuracy unless otherwise noted.

chick deliveriesNew to raising chicks? Prepare for your backyard flock with these great tips from Purina.

Raising chickens is a great experience for the whole family. One of the primary requirements is providing housing that is comfortable for your backyard flock. Young chicks can be raised in a variety of structures, but the area should be warm, dry and ventilated, but not drafty. Also, make sure it is easy to clean.

Warming:
Small numbers of chicks can be warmed adequately with heat lamps placed about 20 inches above the litter surface.
  • Bigger groups of birds in a large room, such as a shed or a garage, should have a supplemental heat source such as a brooder stove.
Before you bring them home:
Several days in advance, thoroughly clean and disinfect the brooder house and any equipment the chicks will use. Doing this in advance will allow everything to dry completely. Dampness is a mortal enemy to chicks, resulting in chilling and encouraging disease such as coccidiosis (parasite infection).
  • When the premises are dry, place 4 to 6 inches of dry litter material (wood shavings or a commercial litter) on the floor.

Feeders and Waterers
It’s important to ensure your chicks have access to fresh feed and water. Positioning the feeders and waterers along the edges of the comfort zone will:

  • Keep the water and feed from being overheated
  • Help keep water and feed cleaner (chicks milling and sleeping under the warmth source often scatter bedding and feces)
  • Encourage the chicks to move around and get exercise

Be sure to have plenty of fresh feed and water when the chicks arrive:

  • At least two 1-quart or one 1-gallon waterer for every 25 to 50 chicks
  • Dip the beaks of several chicks into the water to help them locate it. These chicks will teach the rest.
Feeders:
  • Day 1: Use clean egg flats, shallow pans or simple squares of paper with small piles of feed on them.
  • Day 2: Add proper feeders to the pens.
  • A few days later: Remove the messy papers, pans or egg flats once chicks have learned to eat from the feeders.
Waterers:
  • Should be emptied, scrubbed, rinsed and refilled daily
  • Wet litter around waterers should be removed as often as possible. Dampness encourages disease and parasite transmission. The drier the premises, the healthier and happier the chicks.
  • At about 4 weeks of age, ducks and geese will appreciate a swimming area, but you will need to keep the wet litter cleaned up.
  • In winter months, you may need to purchase a water heater to prevent water from freezing.
  As chicks grow:
  • Feeders and waterers can be moved outward from the heat source, expanding their area of activity and helping keep the feeders and waterers clean.
  • As the birds grow, the feeders and waterers should be adjusted to the height of the back of a standing bird. This will help decrease contamination and minimize wastage

Feeding your chicks
It is important to select a complete feed that gives your chicks all the nutrition they need to grow into healthy hens. Once they’ve reached maturity,a high-quality complete layer feed will help to maximize egg production and quality. If they are broiler chicks, choose a feed designed to support their more rapid growth. Layer chicks will reach egg-laying age at about 18 to 20 weeks; broiler chicks will reach market weight at 8 to 10 weeks.

You may also consider occasional supplements to their diets, such as table scraps, scratch grains, oyster shell, and grit. However, supplemental feeds should make up no more than 10 percent of a hen’s diet.

Purina offers a complete line of poultry feeds appropriate for each bird in your flock. A list of Purina products can be found here.

Lighting and heating for your chicks
A thermometer should be placed at the chicks’ level to accurately gauge temperature.

  • Adjust the brooder stove and/or heat lamps 24 hours in advance so that upon the chicks’ arrival, you’ve created a comfort zone that is 90º F at “chick level.”
  • For turkey chicks, the comfort zone should be 100º F.
  • Use a brooder guard (a plastic, cardboard or wire barrier) for a few days to encircle the brooding area so that the chicks don’t wander too far from the warmth.
  • Once chicks have learned where the heat is, remove or expand the guard. This will allow the chicks to escape the heat if necessary. Getting overheated can be as dangerous as getting chilled.
  • Chicks that huddle under the lamp are too cold. Chicks that sprawl along the brooder guard is too hot. Chicks happily milling around all portions of the brooder area are comfortable.
  • The temperature can be gradually reduced by 5º F per week to a minimum of 55º F.

Even after your chicks have grown into hens, keep a standard old-fashioned 40-watt incandescent light bulb handy; or, if you’re using the new energy-efficient bulbs, a 28-watt halogen, 10-watt compact fluorescent, or 8-watt LED bulb, to maintain the artificial light necessary for egg laying to continue through the winter months.

Source: Purina Poultry

Get all your baby chick and chicken supplies at J&N Feed and Seed! We have chicken feed, feeders, fencing, waterers, heat lamps and more!

Introducing New Chickens to Your Flock

Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

introducing new chickens to your flock

Whether you’re starting with a group of new chicks or you’re looking to add a few new hens to an existing flock, proper planning, care and management can help the transition in introducing new chickens to your flock to be most successful.

Mikelle Roeder, Ph.D., a flock nutrition expert for Purina Animal Nutrition, says it’s especially important to understand the commitment of raising new birds.

“Springtime and new birds are often thought of together: both represent new beginnings and excitement, but we can’t forget that raising chicks is a long-term commitment,” Roeder says.

“Be sure to have a long-term plan and a place for them to live before your new birds arrive,” she adds. “Preparing for new arrivals can help prevent the spread of disease and keep the peace in your existing flock’s pecking order.”

[jwplayer mediaid=”4564″]

Manage new birds separately.

As soon as new birds arrive, keep them separate from the rest of the flock. This allows you to monitor the birds closely and prevent any possible illness from spreading to either group.

“New birds have often traveled a fair amount and been near other birds – and your existing flock may have built immunity to germs in your area,” Roeder says. “Keep new birds in a separate room or coop for 30 days and monitor them to make sure they are free of disease and to acclimate them to your backyard.”

During this period, work with the existing flock first and wash your hands between groups to prevent any cross-contamination.

A similar quarantine plan is recommended for new chicks, as older hens can transmit disease to chicks and pullets. For chicks, though, the separation should last for 18 weeks to help the birds reach mature size and transition onto a layer feed before meeting other members of the flock.

“Start new chicks away from the flock, in a brooder,” Roeder says. “This allows you to provide the chicks supplemental heat and teach them to drink and eat a high-energy complete feed. Once they are ready to enter a coop, continue to raise them separately until they reach the same size as the mature birds to minimize potential physical injuries once the two groups of birds are introduced.”

Introduce birds in groups.

After the quarantine period, gradually familiarize new birds to the existing flock. Introducing groups of birds similar in size and traits into a familiar setting can help provide a smooth transition. Be sure there is plenty of space to prevent overcrowding.

“One way to help both groups acclimate to each other is to place the two groups in side-by-side runs,” Roeder says. “Placing the two groups next to one another for one week can help the birds form bonds before being housed together. It can also alert you to potential personality clashes that may be difficult to resolve. Another strategy is to let the new group free-range first and then introduce the existing flock to place the focus on new surroundings rather than new flock members.”

In either case, add additional feeders and waterers to the run to prevent the new birds from being deterred from eating and drinking. During the introduction period, the new pecking order will begin to be established. In most flocks, one bird is dominant in the group and the remaining birds will fall into an accepted order below the dominant bird. Occasionally two strong-willed birds may consistently fight in an attempt to gain the position of dominant bird.  In this case, the owner may need to find a new home for one of them in order to maintain peace in the flock.

“The pecking order is a very stable structure in the group until a bird is removed or new birds are added,” Roeder says. “At that point, the order must be re-established. Add new birds in a group with similar-sized hens and plenty of available feed, space and water to help ease the transition.”

Monitor for success.

After new birds are added to the group, monitor the flock for success or fallouts.

“Watch the group closely after the introduction,” Roeder says. “Birds that are happy, healthy and content will continue their routines without changes in personality or feed consumption. Consistency is especially important during transitions, so be sure to continue providing high-quality complete feed, shelter and fresh water at all times.”

Mikelle Roeder, Ph.D. – Multi-Species Nutritionist – Purina Mills

Keep your Backyard Flock Cool, Calm and Comfortable

Monday, June 13th, 2016

Two chickens walking on grass with a chicken coop behindSummer is a time for fun, adventure and excitement – for both flock owners and backyard flocks. As the summer sun hits its peak, flock owners can apply their own summer health practices to better care for their backyard poultry.

The summertime essentials are similar for both humans and backyard flocks: stay hydrated, protect yourself from the heat and maintain a complete and balanced diet.

As humans, our habits change in the summer. We adapt to stay comfortable. By providing our backyard chickens the tools they need, they can also adapt and enjoy the sunshine.

Many people don’t realize that birds are unable to sweat. To cool down, they open their beaks and pant or spread their wings away from their bodies. If these cooling strategies are not enough, birds are more likely to become lethargic and may stop eating feed, which can lead to subsequent health challenges and reduced egg production.

We want to avoid these signs of heat stress by preventing problems before they begin. With the right care, birds will maintain their routines of foraging, pecking and chattering throughout the day.

Remember the H2O
Staying hydrated in the summer is a clear choice for humans. As temperatures rise, a good rule for people to follow is to calculate half your body weight in pounds and drink the equivalent number of ounces of water.

For our backyard chickens, the practice should be similar: Clean, cool water is essential. Follow the general rule of providing 500 milliliters of fresh water per bird per day. This equates to one gallon for every seven adult birds.

Drinking water helps cool birds’ body temperatures. In high temperatures, chickens will drink up to twice as much water as during temperate conditions. If chickens do not have quality water, they are less likely to eat or lay eggs.

To help chickens stay hydrated:
  • Provide extra waterers so each bird has access at all times.
  • Place waterers in a shaded area to help keep the water cool and the coop dry.
  • Offer fresh, cool water in the morning and evening.
  • Freeze water in a storage container. Place the resulting ice in the waterer in the morning to keep the water cool.
  • Place marbles in waterers to prevent splashing.
  • Wash waterers weekly with a mixture of 10 percent bleach and 90 percent water. Rinse thoroughly.

Keep body temperature in check
Think of your most recent day in the sun. You likely incorporated a few cooling practices to maintain an adequate body temperature and avoid heat stress.

A consistent body temperature is equally important for backyard flocks.

If a bird’s body temperature climbs, it can cause a lasting strain. Create a cool and comfortable environment for the flock to enjoy.

To keep chickens comfortable:

  • Provide shade by placing roofs on the run or shade cloths over the door. Add misters outside of the chicken coop that spray onto the roof or shade cover for evaporative cooling.
  • Create adequate air flow inside the coop. Open all windows and roof vents to allow hot air and ammonia to escape. Add a small fan for air circulation.
  • Swap solid coop doors with screen doors and keep lights off during the day. Reduce bedding to two inches or less to avoid heat being trapped.
  • Provide a peat moss dust bath for backyard chickens to play in. If mites are a concern, switch to a mix of 90 percent peat moss, 10 percent diatomaceous earth.
  • Avoid overcrowding by providing at least 4 square feet of indoor space and 5-10 square feet of outdoor space per bird.

Indulge a bit, but keep a balance
It can be argued that fresh-from-the-garden fruits and vegetables, summertime snacks and potluck picnics are true summer highlights. But, no matter the treat, it’s important to maintain a balance.

A balanced diet is very important for our backyard poultry as well. Summer is the perfect time to spend in the backyard with the flock and give them a few indulgent snacks, but don’t forget the 90/10 rule: 90 percent complete feed and 10 percent treats or snacks.

To help keep the flock’s diet in balance:

  • Give fresh complete feed in the morning and evening in a shaded area, offering treats only after the flock has finished its complete feed.
  • Offer cold or frozen fruits and vegetables as a summertime treat.
  • Provide special treats such as Purina® Flock Block® or Purina® Scratch Grains as a complement to a complete feed. Treats formulated specifically for birds can provide beneficial nutrients while keeping birds active.
  • Offer free-choice grit if your flock is fed whole grains, seeds or other non-commercial feedstuffs. Purina® Chick or Poultry Gritcan be fed separately or mixed with your flock’s grain diet at a rate of 1 pound of grit per 20 pounds of feed.
  • Offer oyster shell to help maintain calcium intake and eggshell quality when birds may be eating less due to heat.
  • Provide at least six inches of feeder space per bird.

Summer heat tends to reduce feed intake, so the complete feed should be the first dietary priority. When birds have a balanced diet, plenty of water and a cool, comfortable environment, they are better able to remain healthy and productive and enjoy a fun and peaceful backyard summer.

By Mikelle Roeder, Ph.D. – Multi-Species Nutritionist – Purina Mills

Treats & Snacks: Are They Good for My Hens?

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

One flock owner recently asked me about the diet of his laying hens. He’s feeding his flock a complete feed, and supplementing the complete feed with bread, porridge and meal-worms.

“I want to stop this habit (of feeding so many treats) as it’s expensive, but how?” he asked. My response to him – and to other flock raisers – is to follow a 90/10 rule for laying hens: 90% complete feed and 10% treats. Not only can this cut on costs, it helps us provide a balanced diet to our birds.

10% Treats
We recommend limiting the amount of treats we give our hens to 10 percent of the diet.This allows us to shift our focus to providing nutrients through a complete feed. Though treats are a fun addition to our flock, a complete feed provides the necessary nutrients our hens need to stay healthy and produce high-quality eggs.

I encourage flock owners to think of kitchen scraps and scratch grains as M&M’s for birds; fun to eat and a nice treat, but you wouldn’t want to make a meal of them. Similar to candy for us, kitchen scraps and scratch grains are not fortified with vitamins and minerals – key nutrients that laying hens require.

In fact, every time we provide unfortified feeds, we dilute the complete nutrition of the layer feed and the hens may actually receive less nutrition than they would if they just ate their complete feed. If we feed high levels of treats, the hens will likely eat more of them than their fortified feed, causing them to miss out on the nutrients they need.

Since we all know it is fun to feed treats, feel free to view these items as special goodies that our hens get in small amounts a few times a week – but be cautious to not overfeed.

90% Complete Feed
To help hens receive the nutrients they need, provide at least 90 percent of their diet through a complete feed formulated specifically for laying hens.

Hens require at least 38 different nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, amino acids and energy. Many of these nutrient requirements increase as hens continue to lay eggs. Complete feeds are formulated to provide this balanced diet.
Let’s take a look at one of these 38 required nutrients: Calcium. If the hen is eating high levels of scratch grains or kitchen scraps, she won’t consume her daily allotment of complete feed. Without the complete feed levels she needs, she won’t have the calcium she requires to produce strong, high-quality eggshells. Instead, she will pull from her calcium reserves to produce eggs, potentially resulting in a weak skeletal structure.

Similar trends can be seen if the other essential nutrients are not provided in the proper levels. To meet the increased nutrient demands of egg production, choose a high-quality complete layer feed and ensure it is the primary part of the hen’s diet. A complete feed is formulated to provide all of the nutrients your bird requires for long-term health and nutritious eggs.

For hens 18 weeks and older, look for a complete feed that includes:

  • 16% (minimum) protein level
  • Lysine and methionine, essential amino acids
  • Calcium, manganese and trace minerals for strong shells
  • Fortified with vitamins, trace minerals and essential amino acids
  • Prebiotics and probiotics for hen health

A complete feed, like Purina® Layena® Premium Poultry Feed, can help hens receive the nutrients they require.  By choosing a complete layer feed, comprised of high-quality ingredients, and sticking to the 90/10 rule, we can help our hens stay happy, healthy and productive.

Mikelle Roeder, Ph.D. – Multi-Species Nutritionist – Purina Mills

Baby Chicks & Guineas Are Here

Friday, March 11th, 2016

baby chicksBaby chicks & guineas are here at J&N Feed and Seed.

Baby Chicks and Guineas are available at J&N Feed & Seed. The baby chicks are mixed breed, pullets and sell for $2.50 each.

While you’re picking out your chicks, J&N Feed and Seed has everything you need to raise a happy flock! See us for all your poultry supplies: feed, heaters, feeders, waterers, bedding, fencing and more.

Start your chicks off right with our new Purina Organic Chicken Feed. Raising an organic flock has never been easier. To learn more about Purina Organic Chicken Feed click here.

 

 

 

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