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Tips For Planting Seed Potatoes

Tuesday, January 5th, 2021

Tips for planting seed potatoes from J&N Feed and Seed in Graham, Texas.Onion sets and seed potatoes arrive mid-January at J&N Feed and Seed. Planting seed potatoes and onions are at the top of everyone’s gardening list this time of year. As everyone in North Texas knows, our late January and February weather can be a gamble— temps can be spring-like one day and fall below freezing the next.  But, the weather extremes should not deter gardeners from planting during these months.  Potatoes are top of the list for planting this time of year.

Other good go-to cold weather vegetables are root produce such as turnips, beets, and carrots as well as hardy leafy greens like spinach, cabbage, kale, and chard. Bulb veggies (onions and garlic), as well as asparagus crowns, can also be planted at this time.

Preparing and Planting Potatoes 

When purchasing seed potatoes, look for certified seed potatoes. These are seeding potatoes that have not been treated with growth retardants to prevent sprouting. Conventional potatoes in grocery markets are typically treated with retardants.

After you have planned and prepared a garden spot with well-drained, loose soil, the seed potatoes can be prepped for planting:

Cut each seed potato into quarters (sulfur dust can be applied to the fresh cut ends) and let the potato quarters set out overnight or longer until cut sides callus over.  Seed potato quarters are then ready to plant— for a good rule of thumb, potato quarters should be planted 3” to 4” deep and spaced 12” to 15” apart. To provide plants plenty of growing room, make sure rows are spaced 24” to 36” apart.

Caring for Potato Plants

Potatoes need consistent moisture, so water regularly when tubers start to form.  Before the potato plants bloom, hilling should be done when the plant is about 6 inches tall. Hoe the dirt up around the base of the plant in order to cover the root as well as to support the plant. Bury the plant base in loose soil. Hilling will keep the potato plants from getting sunburned, in which case they turn green and will taste bitter.  You will need to hill potatoes every couple of weeks to protect your crop.

When the potato plants have bloomed, new potatoes are ready for harvest.  For larger potatoes, harvest only after plant tops has fallen over. For more information on planting seed potatoes, visit the Texas A&M website.

Other Cool Weather Vegetable Plantings

Lettuce, spinach, and cabbage can be planted at this time either by seeds or plant starts. For reference, these vegetables can be planted in February with seed or starter plants.

Stop by J&N for your seed potatoes, onion sets, and other cool-weather vegetables.

January Garden Tips

Tuesday, December 29th, 2020

January Garden Tips

It may be chilly outside at this time of the year, but winter is a perfect time for a number of outdoor chores. Just consider how much better outdoor chores like soil preparation, planting, transplanting, and pruning can be done without toiling in hot summer temperatures.

January Garden If you need to move a plant to a different spot in the landscape, this is the month to accomplish this job. Most plants move best when they are fully dormant as a result of prolonged exposure to cold temperatures. Remove some of the top growth to compensate for the inevitable loss of some of the roots. Once the plant is moved, water thoroughly, apply root stimulator, and a few inches of mulch over the root area.

January is a great month to accomplish pruning of fruit trees. Annual pruning keeps the harvest within reach, thins crowded branches, allowing more light to penetrate developing fruit and stimulates new growth for next year’s crop. Shade trees can also be pruned at this time.

Fruit trees and vines can be planted at this time as the ground usually does not freeze here in north Texas. You can also prepare the soil for new flower, rose or shrub beds by mixing plenty of organic material like compost or a flower or shrub mix. This way the soil is ready for immediate planting when temperatures get a little warmer.

Fertilize pansies to keep them actively growing. Houseplants can be fertilized with reduced rates of water-soluble fertilizer this month. Do not over-water your houseplants.

Birds of all kinds appreciate a constant source of seed, suet and water during the winter and you will enjoy the activity they create in your backyard. Just remember once you start feeding, you should keep it up through the winter.

Winterize your Chicken Coop

Monday, November 2nd, 2020

when will pullet start to lay eggs- https://www.jandnfeedandseed.comWinter is upon us and egg production tends to slow down in late fall due to the shorter days. Lighting is a huge component to this decrease as well as the temperature drop. A laying hen’s endocrine system is stimulated by light so the shorter days slow egg production or can stop it completely. Some flock owners look at winter as a dormant break for their laying hens.  Other owners like to keep the production throughout the winter months. In order to do this, hens need more than 14 hours of light during the day.

Lighting:

A nine-watt compact fluorescent bulb is all that’s needed for a typical backyard coop. Plug the light into a timer and have it come on early enough in the morning to give the birds 15 hours of daylight, and egg production will be improved through the shorter days of winter.The light needs to light up the largest area possible. Clean the lamps once a week to keep them clean to output as much light as possible.

Heat Lamps:

Start this process in late fall since the lighting changes at that time. Make sure to hang the lamp or bulb up in the coop where the chickens can’t snuggle up to the lamp and cinge there feathers. Make sure the light reaches the whole coop and offers heat throughout.

Other Tips on Winterizing:

Keep the coop dry and clean. The best way to do this is to keep make sure the coop will not have standing water if rain comes. Make sure to replace the bedding with dry bedding each week.

Bedding also provides insulation for the chickens. Cover large holes where drafts or critters can enter. Be careful not to cover up all the holes so proper ventilation can occur.

Freezing temperatures can freeze up the water source. Think about getting a heated water source or pour fresh water each day.

It’s important to gather eggs daily because those can freeze as well.

Throw down extra feed or corn before they head to roost at night. This will provide energy and keep them warm at night.

Your flock needs some time and attention during the winter months to keep up with egg production. The extra work is worth it! You’ll have a full carton of eggs all winter!

 

Cattle Feed Booking at J&N Feed

Thursday, October 1st, 2020

Winter cattle feed booking is now available at J&N Feed and Seed. Yes, it’s that time of year again. Stop by the store now and lock in your feed price for the winter month contract season. Make sure you get the BEST available nutrition for your animals at the BEST price booking with J&N Feed and Seed.  Please call the store at 940-549-4631 or stop by for current pricing.

J&N Feed and Seed
450 Pecan St
Graham, TX 76450-2524
(940) 549-4631

At J&N Feed and Seed we’ve got the quality feeds and the booking proposition you need to stay on top of the cattle business.

 

Hunting Attractants, Supplies & More

Thursday, October 1st, 2020

Bow Season has begun and whitetail deer rifle season is only a few weeks away! J&N Feed and Seed has the Hunting Attractants, feeds and equipment to help you get your hunt on!  We’ve got attractants from Big&J, Wild Game Innovators, Quick Draw and more. Pick up a bag of Sugar Beet Crush or BB2 Long Range Attractant today and sit back and watch the big deer come in.

Visit us at J&N Feed and Seed today and gear up for the season with our latest wildlife cameras from Browning Trail Cameras or pick up a new rifle scope or binoculars from Vortex Optics.  We also stock plenty of deer feed supplements such as Purina AntlerMax as well as whole deer corn. And, you need a YETI cooler to carry home your kill— we’ve got everything you need to get your hunt on at J&N Feed and Seed, right here in Graham, Texas!

Three Tips To Help Molting Chickens

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2020

Molting Chicken Tips from J&N Feed and Seed in Graham, Texas.It’s autumn. Time for comfy sweaters, pumpkin-flavored everything, and… vacation? For backyard chickens across the country, shorter days often signal time for a break. Birds may stop laying eggs, lose old feathers, and grow new ones. This annual vacation from egg laying is called molt.

Molt is driven by season and usually occurs in the fall when the hours of sunlight decrease. For our birds, fall means it’s time to prepare for winter, which requires quality feathers. That’s why hens take a vacation from laying eggs and redirect their energy to regrowing feathers.

 When do chickens molt?

This feather loss phenomenon first happens when birds are approximately 18 months old and then occurs annually. Backyard flock owners should expect about 8 weeks of feather loss and regrowth but could take up to 16 weeks for some birds.

Though the general process is similar, not all molting seasons are created equal.

The onset and length of the molt look different for each bird. How long chickens molt for depends on factors such as age, consumed nutrients, and the environment. You’ll often first notice that feathers are losing their sheen. Hens may then gradually lose a few feathers or it could happen overnight. We’ve noticed that more productive egg-layers and younger hens recover from molt more quickly than older or less productive hens. In any case, proper nutrients and management can help birds through molt.

Three tips for molting chickens

  1. Pack the protein Just like humans, birds need a different diet depending on their current activity or life stage. Protein is the key nutrient to pack in a flock’s diet during molt. The number one nutrient switches from calcium to protein during molt. This is because feathers are made of 80-85 percent protein, whereas eggshells are primarily calcium. When you notice your chickens losing feathers, switch to a complete feed that’s 20 percent protein and includes probiotics, prebiotics, and key vitamins and minerals. Purina® Flock Raiser® chicken feed is a key option. A high-protein complete feed can help hens channel nutrients into feather regrowth and get back to laying eggs.For organic flocks, try switching hens to Purina® Organic Starter-Grower when molting begins in order to maintain organic status and provide a higher level of nutrition they need for feather regrowth.
  2. Keep stress low
    While on vacation, people generally want plenty of comfort and room to relax. It isn’t so different inside the coop during molt. Keep molting chickens comfortable by preventing stress. During molt, the area where the feather shaft meets the skin can be very sensitive, so reduce handling and provide plenty of clean bedding. Offer enough space for your birds to rest and relax in private. For each bird, four square feet inside the coop and 10 square feet outside of the coop can keep them comfortable. In addition, provide access to plenty of fresh, clean water and proper air ventilation. Hydration and ventilation can help keep the backyard coop spa-like for feather regrowth. Avoid introducing new flock members during this time, as adding in new friends and potentially re-shuffling the pecking order could add stress.
  3. Transition back to layer feed
    Once birds are ready to return from vacation and begin producing eggs, it’s time to adjust the nutrient profile to match their energy needs once again. When hens begin laying eggs, transition back to a complete layer feed that matches your goals. Gradually mix the complete layer feed with the high-protein feed over the course of 7 to 10 days. This can help avoid digestive upsets and allows birds to get used to the taste and texture of their new feed. Once they’re back on a complete layer feed and have vibrant new feathers, get ready again for farm fresh eggs for your family.

Fall Seed & Fertilizer

Sunday, August 30th, 2020

fall seedNow is the time to get your fall seed. We have over 40 types of seed including wheat, oats, barley,  assorted ryegrass seed including Elbon and Marshall Rye, and additives such as chicory and buck plot mixes.  Whether your seeding for livestock grazing, wildlife feed plots or something else, we’ve got the fall seed for you! Not sure what you need? Stop by and talk with our experts, we’re here to help!

We also carry a variety of bagged and bulk fertilizer. Need help getting your bulk fertilizer home? No problem! Use one of our fertilizer buggies free of charge! Stop by J & N Feed and Seed or call us for delivery at (940) 549-4631.

It’s Time To Plant Food Plot Mixes

Saturday, August 29th, 2020

Food Plot MixesA food plot is a planted area set aside to act as a food source for wildlife. The term was coined by the U.S. hunting and outdoor industries. Food plots generally consist of, but are not limited to, legumes (clovers, alfalfa, beans, etc.) or forage grasses.

We are at the start date to plant winter food plots for deer. Product selection in this area is vast.  At J&N Feed and Seed, we carry a large number of food plot mixes including wheat, oats, winter peas, chicory, clover, turnips and alfalfa.  Stop by today and choose your plot mix. If you have any questions please give us a call or stop by the store.

2020 – 2021 Texas Hunting Season Dates

Monday, July 20th, 2020

Texas Parks & Wildlife released the 2020 – 2021 Texas Hunting Season dates. Check them out below. You can find more information on their website. Stop by J&N Feed and Seed for all your hunting supplies, feeds, and attractants. Ask us about our feeder filling services.

Texas Hunting Season DatesAlligator
22 Counties & special properties: Sep 10 — 30, 2020
All Other Counties: Apr 1 — June 30, 2021

Chachalaca
Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr & Willacy Counties: Oct 31 — Feb 28, 2021

Dove
North Zone
Sep 1 — Nov 12, 2020 & Dec 18, 2020 — Jan 3, 2021

Central Zone
Sep 1 — Nov 1, 2020 & Dec 18, 2020 — Jan 14, 2021

South Zone
Regular season: Sep 14 — Nov 1, 2020 & Dec 18, 2020 — Jan 23, 2021
Additional days for Special White-winged Dove season: Sep. 5, 6, 12, 13 (special regulations apply)

Duck
North Zone
Regular season: Nov 14 — 29, 2020 & Dec 5, 2020 — Jan 31, 2021
Youth-only: Nov 7 — 8, 2020

South Zone
Regular season: Nov 7 — 29, 2020 & Dec 12, 2020 — Jan 31, 2021
Youth-only: Oct 31 — Nov 1, 2020

High Plains Mallard Management Unit (HPMMU)
Regular season: Oct 31 — Nov 1, 2020 & Nov 6, 2020 — Jan 31, 2021
Youth-only: Oct 24 — 25, 2020

Gallinule, Rail, Moorhen
Sep 12 — 27 & Nov 7 – Dec 30, 2020

Goose
East Zone
Early Canada goose: Sep 12 — 27, 2020
Light & dark geese: Nov 7, 2020 — Jan 31, 2021
Light goose conservation order: Feb 1 — Mar 14, 2021

West Zone
Light & dark geese: Nov 14, 2020 — Feb 14, 2021
Light goose conservation order: Feb 15 — Mar 14, 2021

Javelina
North Zone: Oct 1, 2020 — Feb 28, 2021
South Zone: Sep 1, 2020 — Aug 31, 2021

Mule Deer
General Season
Panhandle: Nov 21 — Dec 6, 2020
SW Panhandle: Nov 21 — 29, 2020
Trans-Pecos: Nov 27 — Dec 13, 2020

Archery Season
Oct 3 — Nov 6, 2020

Pheasant
Panhandle: Dec 5, 2020 — Jan 3, 2021

Pronghorn
Oct 3 — 11, 2020

Quail
Statewide: Oct 31, 2020 — Feb 28, 2021

Rabbits & Hares
No closed season.

Sandhill Crane
Zone A: Oct 31, 2020 — Jan 31, 2021
Zone B: Nov 27, 2020 — Jan 31, 2021
Zone C: Dec 19, 2020 — Jan 24, 2021

Squirrel
East Texas: Oct 1, 2020 — Feb 28, 2021 & May 1 — 31, 2021
Other Open Counties: Sep 1, 2020 — Aug 31, 2021
Youth-Only Season: Sep 26 — 27, 2020

Snipe
Nov 7, 2020 — Feb 21, 2021

Teal
Sep 12 — 27, 2020

Rio Grande Turkey
Fall Season
North Zone: Nov 7, 2020 — Jan 3, 2021
South Zone: Nov 7, 2020 — Jan 17, 2021
Brooks, Kenedy, Kleberg & Willacy counties: Nov 7, 2020 — Feb 28, 2021
Archery-Only: Oct 3 — Nov 6, 2020

Fall Youth-Only
North Zone: Oct 31 — Nov 1, 2020 & Jan 4 — 17, 2021
South Zone: Oct 31 — Nov 1, 2020 & Jan 18 — 31, 2021

Spring Season
North Zone: Apr 3 — May 16, 2021
South Zone: Mar 20 — May 2, 2021
One-turkey counties: April 1 — 30, 2021

Spring Youth-Only
North Zone: Mar 27 — 28 & May 22 — 23, 2021
South Zone: Mar 13 — 14 & May 8 — 9, 2021

Eastern Turkey
Spring Season
East Texas: Apr 22 — May 14, 2021

White-tailed Deer

General Season
North Zone: Nov 7, 2020 — Jan 3, 2021
South Zone: Nov 7, 2020 — Jan 17, 2021

Special Late Season
North Zone: Jan 4 — 17, 2021
South Zone: Jan 18 — 31, 2021

Youth-Only Seasons
Early Season: Oct 31 — Nov 1, 2020
Late Season: Jan 4 — 17, 2021

Archery Season
Oct 3 — Nov 6, 2020
Muzzleloader-Only Season
Jan 4 — 17, 2021

Woodcock
Dec 18, 2020 — Jan 31, 2021

Texas Hunting Season Dates

Railroad Ties Back In-Stock

Monday, July 6th, 2020

Railroad ties available at J&N Feed and Seed in Graham, TX. Looking for railroad ties for your next outdoor project? Look no further than J&N Feed and Seed. We’ve got them in-stock at J&N Feed. Railroad ties lend a raw, natural beauty to any landscaping project. Ties can be used as functional elements or for decorative accents. Construct beautiful fences, corrals, chutes, steps, retaining walls, flower boxes, borders, and walkways with ties. Use ties for construction applications instead of brick, cinder block, or synthetic materials. Ties can also be used in combination with other materials to create a variety of attractive textures and designs.  # 1-grade rail road ties are the best-used ties you can buy, with three good, solid sides and moderate imperfection. Come see us for all your landscaping needs.

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