Archive for July, 2012

Texas Deer Hunting Regulations

Tuesday, July 24th, 2012

Deer hunting in Texas is a popular pursuit, governed by the regulations set forth by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Hunters have their choice of white-tailed deer or mule deer to hunt in the Lone Star State.

 Licenses

Texas law requires that every deer hunter possess a license. Those younger than 17 must have a youth hunting license while those 17 and older must purchase a regular hunting license.

Types

There are various types of open seasons for both white-tailed deer and mule deer in Texas. There are seasons for taking these species with a bow, with a muzzleloader and with a rifle as well as seasons for antlerless and “spike” deer.

Identification

In Texas, the regulations define a “buck deer” as one that has a hardened antler sticking out of its skin on its head. A “spike deer” is one with antlers that have no more than a single point on them.

Limits

A deer hunter in Texas may bag as many as five white-tailed deer during the various seasons, but only three of them can be bucks. For mule deer, the combined seasons’ bag limit is two individual deer, with only one a buck.

Special Permit

The Texas Parks and Wildlife department can issue a “managed lands deer permit” to qualifying landowners. It allows hunters to exceed bag limits and enjoy an extended deer-hunting season. These hunters must have the permission of the landowner to hunt on the property.

Resources

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/hunt/season/animal_listing/

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/hunt/public/

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/learning/hunter_education/

 

Source:  John Lindell, eHow Contributor

A Home for Every Horse Promotion!

Tuesday, July 17th, 2012

Help us share the news! Purina Horse feed  giving away $125,000 of free feed to 501(c)(3) rescue shelters as part of A Home for Every Horse! This helpful flyer explains how rescues can take advantage of this donation. 501(c)(3) rescue shelters have until August 17, 2012 to email their 501(c)(3) forms to [email protected] or fax them to 623-434-9200.

 

Your Invited to save $10!

Monday, July 16th, 2012

When it comes to your cattle starter program you can see the difference Purina Great Starts makes!

Come learn about the value of a Great Starts Cattle Feeding Program and SAVE $10 on your purchase of 10 bags or Tubs of Purina Cattle Starter Feeds.

Ask for your coupon in our store!  Applicable with manufacturer’s coupon only.

Valid June 30-12/31, 2012.

Horse Q&A: Amount and Type of Feed

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

Horse feedAm I feeding enough of the right type of feed?

Since most people feed by the “scoop” rather than by weight, if is often easy to overestimate the amount of feed you are providing.  Weighing out your feed will help.  Additionally, be sure to consult the feeding directions on the back of the bag.  Most feeds are formulated in such a way that a minimum feeding rate is required to provide for the nutrient and calorie requirements of a particular weight, lifestage and lifestyle.  For example, you may be feeding your horse 5 year old 1000 lb. horse in light work one scoop of Strategy twice a day but he is losing weight.  You decide to weigh out one scoop of Strategy and find that your scoop holds one pound of Strategy, therefore you have been feeding 2 lb./day total. Strategy is formulated to be fed at a minimum rate of 3-4 lb. /day to an adult 1000 lb. horse in light work in order to provide the basic nutrients and calories a horse of that description requires.  So even though you thought you were providing an adequate amount of feed, it turns out that based on weight, you weren’t and you need to increase the volume fed.

 

Source: Purina Mills Equine Specialist

Horse Q&A: Amount and Type of Feed

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

Horse feedAm I feeding enough of the right type of feed?

Since most people feed by the “scoop” rather than by weight, if is often easy to overestimate the amount of feed you are providing.  Weighing out your feed will help.  Additionally, be sure to consult the feeding directions on the back of the bag.  Most feeds are formulated in such a way that a minimum feeding rate is required to provide for the nutrient and calorie requirements of a particular weight, lifestage and lifestyle.  For example, you may be feeding your horse 5 year old 1000 lb. horse in light work one scoop of Strategy twice a day but he is losing weight.  You decide to weigh out one scoop of Strategy and find that your scoop holds one pound of Strategy, therefore you have been feeding 2 lb./day total. Strategy is formulated to be fed at a minimum rate of 3-4 lb. /day to an adult 1000 lb. horse in light work in order to provide the basic nutrients and calories a horse of that description requires.  So even though you thought you were providing an adequate amount of feed, it turns out that based on weight, you weren’t and you need to increase the volume fed.

 

Source: Purina Mills Equine Specialist

Horse Q&A: Feed Concentrate

Friday, July 6th, 2012

Horse FeedAm I feeding the right type of concentrate for my horses’ lifestage and lifestyle?

Horses in different stages of life and with different levels of activity will have different nutrient and caloric requirements. Choosing a feed to fit your horses’ lifestage and lifestyle will help to ensure that those requirements are being met.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Purina Mills Equine Specialist

Horse Q&A: Sufficient Forage

Friday, July 6th, 2012

Is the forage high quality and available in sufficient quantities?

It is not uncommon to find that hay and pasture that appear to be of good quality are actually poorly digestible or low in certain nutrients.  By having your hay and pasture grass tested you can assess the nutrient content and digestibility of your forage source.  Additionally, most people feed hay by the flake and do not weigh it.  There is a lot of variability in the weight of a flake of hay that can be dependent on hay type and the way it was baled.  Weighing hay is a good way of determining that you are feeding enough.  While it is not possible to weigh the grass your horse is taking in while grazing, careful inspection of pastures to ensure that there is an adequate quantity of edible grass present is a good idea.

 

Source: Purina Mills Equine Specialist

Horse Q&A: Proper Eating

Friday, July 6th, 2012

Horse Feeding & ForagingIs my horse properly taking in, chewing and swallowing both forage and feed?

By observing your horse while eating hay, grass and feed, you may find that while he is taking in food he may not be actually chewing and/or swallowing it – this is especially common in older horses with poor dentition that may be quidding forages or dropping feed.  The horse appears to be eating well, but in actuality the forage or feed is actually balling up in the cheeks and then being spit out by the horse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Purina Mills Equine Specialist

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