Archive for the ‘Show Chow’ Category

Top 5 Showmanship Tips from the Experts

Friday, December 29th, 2017

The Head of a Cattle Champion Simmental Cow.Countless hours are spent preparing a project heifer or steer for show day.

Early mornings and late nights are consumed washing, feeding, clipping and practicing. All of that work accumulates for ‘5 minutes of fame’ – the brief time when an animal walks into the ring and gets a chance to impress the judge. After a few laps around the ring, exhibitors get a chance to display their animal’s side profile, then animals are pulled in, placed and the class is over.

When all is said and done, exhibitors and their projects have only been in the ring for a few short minutes, even in large, competitive classes. How can exhibitors make the most of those few minutes, while the judge contemplates his or her decision? How can they make sure their animals are presented to perfection during that time, giving the judge the best look possible?

Honor® Show Chow® Ambassadors Dave Allan, Bob May and Kirk Stierwalt have had decades of combined show industry experience and all have had the opportunity to judge showmanship on a regular basis.

Now, they are sharing their top five showmanship tips based on their expertise and experience to help exhibitors and their projects excel in the ring:

1. Teach cattle manners.
“Cattle need to know the cues and fundamentals to be shown properly in the showring,” says Stierwalt. “It’s hard to win, even if you have a good calf, if you can’t get it set up.”

Practicing at home and in various environments is critical. The only way for an animal to learn cues and get comfortable showing is to practice. Practicing in variable environments – whether that be indoor or outdoor, individually or with a group, with background noise or without – can help prepare your animal for a situation they might encounter in the showring.

2. Know your animal.
“Not all cattle are set up the same,” says Stierwalt. “You need to know what your calf looks like from a judge’s point-of-view to show them with the best result.”

For some exhibitors it may come naturally to correct flaws with their project, while for others it may take some time to see what the judge sees in the showring. While one animal may need it’s head held a bit higher, another might need it’s back touched down just a bit more. Practicing both on the halter and off, can help exhibitors identify flaws and learn how best to correct those flaws in the ring.

3. Walk into a staggered position.
One of Dave Allan’s top tips is learning how to walk your cattle into a staggered position to minimize showstick use for feet placement.

“Practice at home by taking the last several steps, switch hands while walking backwards looking at the back feet, and walk them into staggered position,” says Allan. “By doing so, most of the time you’ll only have to move the left front foot. You’ll be set up quickly and avoid a lot of time spent on unnecessary shuffling of the feet.”

Allan adds that learning the in’s and out’s of halter pressure will help when the need does arise to shuffle feet.

4. Set, and don’t forget.
Both Allan and May emphasize that while many parents tell their kids to watch the judge and smile, too often young exhibitors end up staring the judge down and disregarding presentation of their animal.

“Exhibitors spend months preparing for a show. To be competitive you need to watch your animal. First and foremost you need to get them set up, then look for the judge,” says May.

Allan adds, “You need to know where the judge is to correctly set your animal up and watch for cues to get pulled, but priority should be on making sure your animal is set up properly.”

5. Never be late. 
Whether the class is showmanship or the animal’s actual class, May advises exhibitors to always be on time. Be aware of how quickly classes are going, keep a close watch on the showring as your class approaches and be ready to enter the ring once the previous class is in.

If a judge has to wait for a late arrival or is already in the midst of placing the class, exhibitors late to the ring often won’t get the look they worked hard to receive.

An exhibitor may have a potential class-winning animal, but if not properly presented and fed, that animal may not rise to the top. Practicing and perfecting showmanship skills are critical for giving the judge the best look on show day, as is a high-quality plane of nutrition.

For more showring tips join the online community of show enthusiasts at www.facebook.com/HonorShowChow or at www.twitter.com/HonorShowChow.

Article Attributed to Purina Animal Nutrition

10 Daily Tips For Show Cattle

Thursday, July 14th, 2016

show cattleRaising Show Cattle is a lot like sports. When you want to be successful at sports, you don’t just show up for games and expect to win. You attend team practices, you practice at home and you follow the game plan outlined by the coach. The same concept applies to showing cattle. You prepare for the ‘game’ through daily animal care, grooming and seeking guidance from the pros or a ‘coach.’ You follow that game plan right up until show day.

Bob May, Purina® Honor® Show Chow® Ambassador from Mineral Point, Wis., uses an intense and individualized game plan for each of his cattle.

“Success in the showring starts with the cattle’s conformation, but is achieved with consistent hard work and daily care to get the cattle where they need to be at the show,” says May.

The calf may be the star athlete, but even the best athletes don’t perform well without proper daily training, management and a supportive team behind them.

May suggests the following daily care tips to help take your show project to the next level:

1. Involve a veterinarian. Before an animal arrives at your farm, have a plan in place through your veterinarian for health and vaccination protocols. Ask the prior owner for a full health history on the animal, so you can have all of the animal’s health information at hand.

2. Earn the animal’s trust. A show calf needs to trust you, and trust comes in the form of working with the animal on a daily basis. It may be a long, slow process, but it’s one that’s essential to form a partnership with your project animal.

3. Have a consistent feeding routine. May suggests feeding individually at the same time each day. Cattle crave consistency, and when they are fed inconsistently they might also eat inconsistently. May also emphasizes that calves may eat better when they eat in a group setting. To make this possible, he will place individual calves in different runs nose-to-nose and feed them at the same time to mimic feeding in a group.

4. Monitor feed intake. Monitor what your animal is consuming at each feeding, and clean out old feed immediately. May has seen cases where new feed is simply dumped on top of old feed.

“You can quickly lose track of how much feed your calf is actually consuming,” explains May. “You think they are getting 15 pounds at night, and they are actually getting 18 because someone didn’t clean out the old feed from the morning.”

5. Ensure water availability and quality. Animals should have access to clean, cool water at all times. This basic animal care tip is sometimes overlooked, according to May.

“We clean our water tanks frequently,” May says. “Clean, cool water will keep cattle drinking and eating in those hot summer months when consumption usually drops off.”

6. Keep pens and cooler rooms clean. May mentions a good rule of thumb is if it smells or looks wet or dirty – clean it. A clean pen or cooler room will make grooming and daily care of the animal easier for both the animal and the exhibitor.

“If you don’t want to be in those pens or cooler rooms because of the smell, then the animal doesn’t want to be either,” he explains. “Cooler rooms do not equate to hair growth. Cleanliness is most important for hair growth.”

7. Learn the hair cycles. Hair grows in 90-day cycles, and this knowledge can help you determine what stage an animal’s hair will be in (or you want to be in) as you arrive at your show date. For example, for a show in August, May’s goal is to have all the old hair removed by the middle of May.

May doesn’t shear off any of his calves, but recognizes this is a standard practice for some breeds. Instead, he relies on a shedding comb to bust through and remove old hair. The shedding comb works best when hair is dirty and dusty, not wet or caked with manure.

8. Practice, practice, practice. May has his own children show their animals in competition at least twice before heading to their target show. This allows the animals and exhibitors to shake their ‘first-time jitters.’

“Specifically at the county fair level, it may be the first and only time both the kids and the cattle have seen the showring,” he explains. “And usually, that is not a good experience for the exhibitor or the animal.”

9. Find a hoof trimmer you can trust. May encourages all exhibitors to seek an expert in hoof care and recommends networking with other show enthusiasts to find a good trimmer in your area. Unlike clipping and fitting, there is little room for practice on hooves.

“Find a good hoof trimmer that will do a little trimming on the top, but does most of the work underneath the hoof,” he says. “A bad hoof trimming can result in disaster.”

10. Stick to the game plan. Have a management plan. Identify important dates before the show, and execute your plan daily.

“If you don’t focus on the management, other exhibitors will,” explains May. “And quite simply, if you don’t focus – those that do will beat you. They will be better prepared.”

Source: Bob May, Purina Animal Nutrition 

 

2016 Stock Show Dates

Sunday, January 3rd, 2016

2016 stock show

2016 Stock Show season is right around the corner!

The 2016 Stock Show season is going strong— Here are the dates locations of several major 2016 Stock Shows happening throughout Texas in 2016. Go to the links for each Stock Show to learn more about event schedules, entry forms, ticket information and more:

 

Ft Worth Stock Show and Rodeo: January 15 – February 6, 2016

San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo: February 11 – 28, 2016

Star of Texas (Austin Rodeo): March 12 – 26, 2016

Houston Stock Show & Rodeo: March 1 – 20, 2016

State Fair of Texas (Dallas): September 30 – October 23, 2016

Save the dates and make plans now to attend a stock show event near you— the 2016 Stock Shows are a must-do for you and your whole family!

If you’re showing this year, let J&N Feed and Seed get you ready for the big day. We’ve got show feeds by Lindner, Moorman & Honor Show Chow and supplies from Sullivan Show Supplies. We’ve also got shavings, blankets and everything else you need to win big in the ring! Let your friends at J&N Feed and Seed help you raise a winner this year.  And to all the exhibitors, GOOD LUCK!

Purina High Octane Ultra Full Is Here

Tuesday, October 13th, 2015

Purina High Octane Ultra FullPurina High Octane Ultra Full show supplement is now available at J&N Feed and Seed.  Ultra Full show supplement will help you achieve the desired results you need with your show project. High Octane® Ultra Full™ supplement is designed to help support fill in the lower body and flank areas through controlled, progressive expansion. Ultra Full™ supplement can be fed in combination and compliments our High Octane Depth Charge supplement. It’s proprietary ingredient blend enhances palatability to help stimulate feed intake and can be fed to all show livestock species.

Stop by J&N Feed and Seed for all your show feeds, supplements and supplies. Let us help you raise a winner this year!

Show Chow Success: Cuatro Schauer

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

Recent high school graduate Cuatro Schauer shattered records with his prize winning steer at the Fort Worth Stock Show in February.

Cuatro’s cash cow, Spider Monkey, was auctioned off during the Sale of Champions for an astounding $230,000, making it the highest price paid in the shows 116-year history and beating the previous record of $210,000 set in 2010.

Cuatro, a recent graduate of A.C. Jones High School in Beeville, Texas, has been showing steers for nine years, goats for about seven and just recently started showing lambs as well.

“My uncle raises show steers, and he got me into it,” Cuatro said. “He got me my first steer and after that I was sold.”

Showing seems like a natural hobby for Cuatro with the Schauer family background. “My family owns a Purina Feed store that my dad took over in 1994, but my grandpa has been selling feed since 1969,” Cuatro said.

Cuatro attends about ten big shows a year and 15 to 20 prospect shows. Even before his big win at the Fort Worth Stock Show in February, he had some big wins under his belt. Cuatro won the Grand Champion Youth Market Goat at the State Fair of Texas in 2011, Grand Champion Junior Market Steer during the 2011 Rodeo Austin, the Grand Champion Lamb at the 2009 State Fair of Texas and the Reserve Grand Champion steer and medium wool lamb in the San Angelo Stock Show.

In addition to Cuatro’s success, the combination of the people he meets and his competitive drive keep him coming back every year.

“I’ve met a bunch of my really close friends through showing. You’ve got a kind of bond. Someone you meet at a show knows what you do and why you do it,” Cuatro said. “I like showing because you get to see everyone at the shows that you meet, but I am very competitive,” Cuatro said.

Cuatro will be going to Texas A & M this fall to major in Animal Science, along with many of his show friends. Until then he will continue to fill his days taking care of his animals and showing. When he has down time, Cuatro also enjoys golfing, fishing and hunting.

Cuatro is a dedicated customer of Honor® Show Chow® products because of their proven consistency and the results.

“It is one less thing you have to worry about when you go to feed the barn everyday,” Cuatro said.

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