Archive for April, 2018

Mesquite Control With Sendero & Remedy

Thursday, April 26th, 2018

Mesquite control can be a daunting task. If you’re looking for ways to get rid of mesquite and clear the way for more grazing land and wildlife habitat, then come see us at J&N Feed and Seed. We carry TWO products that are proven effective in the control of mesquite. For bMesquite Controlest results, apply mesquite control herbicide during the spring-summer growing season. When mesquite leaves turn dark green, it’s time to spray!

Sendero® herbicide,  gives you the most effective, most consistent chemical control of mesquite ever — down to the roots, releasing native grasses to thrive. Aerial trials prove its superiority.  Sendero® can clear your way to more low-cost grass for livestock, more fringe habitat for wildlife and a lasting legacy for future generations on the land.


Remedy® Ultra
Mesquite Control
herbicide provides flexible, all-purpose brush control with a non-restricted use label and without residual activity. It is the producer’s choice for Individual Plant Treatments.

A mixture of the herbicide Remedy™ and diesel fuel oil is very effective for low-volume, basal stem treatment technique. Diesel acts as a coating to ensure good coverage and absorption. The recommended concentration of Remedy™ will vary depending on the size and age of the mesquite. To read more about the basal stem treatment, click here.

Recommended concentration of Remedy™ to mix with diesel.*

 

Mesquite Type % Remedy™ Amount/Gallon Mixed
Smooth Bark
  1.5 in. diameter or less 15% 19 oz.
  1.5-4 in. diameter 25% 1 quart
Rough Bark 25% 1 quart

Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center

Sawdust And Splinters Wooden Funiture

Sunday, April 22nd, 2018

Sawdust And SplintersJ&N Feed and Seed is your local dealer for Sawdust And Splinters Wooden Furniture.

Are you looking for that perfect swing for your front porch? Or, do you need new patio furniture for your back deck? At J&N Feed and Seed,  you’ll find a great selection of rockers and other patio items made in Texas by Sawdust and Splinters. Outdoor furniture is an investment, so make sure you invest in high-quality pieces from Sawdust And Splinters.  All furniture starts with quality lumber, followed with bolts, screws and quality workmanship, finished with Total Wood Protection stain to ensure quality service for years to come. We are proud to be a dealer of this fine furniture. Avoid the big box stores and come shop with us, where you’ll find a knowledgeable staff and outstanding customer service.

Sawdust and Splinters Wooden Furniture is handcrafted in Gatesville, Texas, by local craftsmen. You won’t find a better quality, look or comfort for your patio. Comfort and functionality are built into every product, including chairs, rockers, gliders, swings, tables and benches.  Stop in and take a look at our wooden furniture. We’re betting you will agree, this is fine quality wooden outdoor furniture, backed by a solid dependable company with a history dating back to 1998!

#1 Grade Railroad Ties At J&N

Tuesday, April 17th, 2018

railroad tiesLooking for railroad ties for your next outdoor project? Look no further than J&N Feed and Seed. We’ve got # 1-grade railroad ties in-stock. Railroad ties lend a raw, natural beauty to any landscaping project. Ties can be used as functional elements or for decorative accents. Construct beautiful fences, corrals, chutes, steps, retaining walls, flower boxes, borders and walkways with ties. Use ties for construction applications instead of brick, cinder block or synthetic materials. Ties can also be used in combination with other materials to create a variety of attractive textures and designs.  # 1-grade rail road ties are the best-used ties you can buy, with three good, solid sides and moderate imperfection. Come see us for all your landscaping needs.

Chicken Coops From SummerHawk Ranch

Tuesday, April 17th, 2018

Start living sunny side up with new chicken coops from SummerHawk Ranch, now available at J&N Feed and Seed. We’ve brought in the Seaside Cottage Chicken Coop and the Pacific Northwest Chicken Coop so your girls can live in style!

Seaside Cottage Chicken Coop –  This design calls to mind those beautiful shoreline escapes. Includes raised coop, decorative cupola, 3 nesting boxes, roosting perch, access ladder, 2 access doors for cleaning, small planter box, 2 windows and a 20-square foot welded metal pen with one door on top and one door at the back. Includes a raised coop with decorative cupola, 3 nesting boxes, roosting perch, access ladder, 2 access doors for cleaning, small planter box, and 2 windows. The 20-square foot welded metal pen features one door on top and one door at the back for easy cleaning access. Product Dimensions: 56″ L x 33″ W x 36″ H; Pen- 66″L x 43″ W x 24″ H

Pacific Northwest Bungalow Chicken Coop  – This design embodies a natural connection to the unique climate and landscape of the area. Includes a raised coop with 3 nesting boxes, roosting perch, access ladder, 2 access doors for cleaning, small planter box, truss feature on one side and a window. The 20-square foot welded metal pen features one door on top and one door at the back for easy cleaning access.  Product Dimensions: Coop- 56″ L x 33″ W x 36″ H; Pen- 66″L x 43″ W x 24″ H.

 

Product Specifications:

  • Stronger and sturdier than competitive coops: Canadian hemlock, a harder, heavier wood is used for all structural support components; thick PVC
  • Humanely sized for happier, healthier hens: most coops are not sized according to community standards for healthy and humane chicken keeping, visit SummerHawkRanch.com/CrueltyFree to learn more
  • Industry-leading full 3-year warranty: 11 times longer than a typical 90-day limited warranty
  • Strong, safe and easy to assemble: experience our new patent-pending GrooveLock Assembly System
  • Also, great for rabbits and small pets

Sprinkler System Checkup

Friday, April 13th, 2018

It’s time for a sprinkler system checkup! With the hot weather just around the corner, it’s time to fire up the sprinkler system again!  For most of us, it’s been a long time since we’ve run our sprinklers and turning on your system may reveal a few surprises since the last time you watered the lawn. That may necessitate a few repairs to get things in working order.

Before your neighbor has to be the one to tell you that water is shooting up in the air, do a check on your system.

HoseSprinklerSuppliesTurn on your sprinklers and take a walk around your yard.

  • Be sure sprinklers are aimed at watering grass, not concrete.
  • Adjust spray heads. On top of each spray-type nozzle is a small adjustment screw. Turn the adjustment screw to adjust each of your spray-type sprinklers so that they don’t spray onto sidewalks or walls.
  • Check the irrigation clock to make sure it has been reset and the timer is. Most folks tend to overwater because the clocks have not been checked since the day they were installed. Think about taking five minutes to make sure your clock operates properly. Be sure your clock is set to water before 10am and after 7pm.
  • Clean clogged sprinkler heads if water is not flowing evenly. These can easily become clogged with dirt over the winter months when not in use.
  • Replace broken or cracked sprinkler heads. This is where water is very quickly wasted! Here is a simple do-it-yourself guide.

Stop by J & N Feed and Seed. We have sprinkler heads and everything you need to get your watering system, hoses and lawn in tip top shape!

Time For Tomatoes

Wednesday, April 4th, 2018

tomatoesApril can be a tricky month with the weather here in Texas. This year we had some cold nights in March, so you may have delayed your tomato planting. In order to get a nice summer harvest we recommend getting them planted soon. But if you’ve delayed until mid-April, here are some tips:

Which varieties are best? Choose your varieties carefully. With a late planting date, it becomes most important that you avoid the huge types like Big Boy, Beefsteak and others. They simply aren’t going to set fruit when temperatures climb above 90. There’s some type of physiological issue that prevents them from doing so, and that same problem stops fruit set when it’s below 70 degrees at night. You’ll be doing well to get five or six fruits from these types that were bred for the Midwest.

Thanks to seed company mergers and the ongoing quest for something new, you’ll also find many of your old favorite tomato varieties are no longer available. Carnival, Merced and 444 are just a few of the types that have disappeared from the market.

What are the best types? Small to mid-sized fruit. In order of increasing size, your shopping list should include Red Cherry, Red or Yellow Pear, Sweet 100 and other super-sweet types, Porter, Roma, Super Fantastic and Celebrity. Look for stout transplants in 4-inch pots. They should be 6 to 8 inches tall, and they need to be toughened to withstand sunlight and wind. If you’ve already planted tomatoes, and if you don’t have any of these smaller types, you still have time to add a few in.

 How should I prepare the soil? Set your plants into well-prepared garden soil to which you have added several inches of organic matter (compost, pine bark mulch, rotted manure and sphagnum peat moss, among others). Plant in beds that have been raised by 5 or 6 inches to ensure good drainage should we have extended periods of rainy weather. Set the plants out 42 to 48 inches apart in rows that are 60 inches apart. If you have transplants that are slightly leggy, dig a shallow trench for each plant and plant it at a 45-degree angle. It will form adventitious roots along the portion of the stem that you plant below grade. Water the plants as soon as you have them all set out.

 What are some key points for growing? Keep the plants off the ground as they begin to grow. Cages you can buy in stores are usually too small for Texas tomato plants. Your plants would probably grow up and out of them before you really started to harvest your crop. It’s much better, instead, to put 5-foot-tall wire cages around every plant. Concrete reinforcing wire works best. Cut it into 54-inch lengths, so that each cage will be approximately 17 inches in diameter. Allow all the “suckers” (branches) to develop, and keep them pushed back within the cages. They will shade the ripening tomatoes and protect them from sunscald.

You can also grow tomatoes in patio pots, as long as they’re large enough to allow normal root growth. In most cases, that will mean 7- or 10-gallon pots, and you’ll want to fill them with a lightweight, highly organic potting soil. Remember that potted tomato plants will dry out much more quickly than their in-ground counterparts, so prepare to water them frequently. Tomatoes that are allowed to wilt badly, whether in pots or in the ground, will typically develop blossom-end rot. The ends of the fruits away from the stems will have brown, sunken spots that will ruin the fruit quality completely.

What about pests? The prime pests of spring tomatoes, in order of their appearance, will be aphids, early blight and spider mites. Aphids are already showing up. They’re small pear-shaped insects that congregate on the newest growth. They’re not the worst pests you might encounter, but you’ll still want to keep them washed off with a hard stream of water. You can also eliminate them with most general-purpose insecticides that are labeled for vegetables.

Early blight usually shows up in mid-May. Thumbprint-sized, bright yellow blotches show up on the bottom-most leaves. Left unchecked, it then spreads up the stems. Keep the foliage as dry as you can, and apply a labeled fungicide to stop its spread. When grooming your plants, take care not to carry the fungal spores to healthy plants via your hands.

Spider mites typically appear about three weeks after you see early blight, so that usually means mid-June in our part of Texas. Lower leaves will have fine light tan mottling, and the discoloration will quickly spread up the stems. By the time you see fine webs between the leaves, you will have waited too long. If you want to confirm early outbreaks, thump a suspect leaf over a sheet of white paper. If you see tiny specks starting to move about freely, those are the mites. Most general-purpose insecticides will offer some degree of control.

Source: Neil Sperry, Time for Tomatoes

100lb D.A.M. Fish Feeder From All Season Feeders

Wednesday, April 4th, 2018

ASF is proud to introduce our new 100lb D.A.M. Fish Feeder, and we’ve got them in-stock at J&N Feed and Seed in Graham, Texas. This Directional Aquatic Management (D.A.M.) feeder is perfect for feeding fish from the pier or pond dam or can be used as a directional corn feeder. This fish feeder comes with our new Directional Air Drive unit the can blow fish feed up to 60+ feet. The base of the feeder comes with skids for easy mounting to a dock, or it can be staked down to the side of your pond dam. The base tilts up to 45˙ to accommodate the slope of your pond dam. This unit holds 100lbs of fish feed. Corn can be used in the unit as well. Comes with ASF Timer, 12v battery, and 12v solar panel.

Features:

  • 100lb D.A.M. Fish FeederEasy adjust 45-degree tilt for pond dam slope adjustment
  • Multiple setting for distance adjustment
  • Fish feed approx. distance (L-40’, M-50’,H-60’)
  • Corn approx. distance (L-50’, M-60’,H-70’+)
  • Easy to fill at 45” tall
  • Varmint proof
  • 100% Heavy duty galvanized construction
  • 1/8” Galvanized skid stand
  • Base measures 32″x 32″
  • Holes on skids for mounting to dock or dam

Includes:
• 12v Directional Air Drive Unit
• The Timer
• 12v Battery
• 12v Solar

Fresh Vegetable Plants, Perennials and Hanging Baskets – Greehouse

Monday, April 2nd, 2018

Vegetable PlantsYou know it’s Springtime with the fresh vegetable plants arrive! Our greenhouse is fully stocked with fresh plants for this time of year! We carry a variety of vegetable plants including squash, zucchini, peppers, tomatoes and much more. We also carry select locally grown vegetables, heirloom vegetables, perennials, and beautiful hanging baskets as well.  Prefer to start your garden from seeds? We’ve got a great selection garden seeds in regular and organic varieties.

Make J&N Feed and Seed your one stop for all your garden supplies including mulch, fertilizer, compost, seeds (including organic), and plants! Looking to plant an organic garden or raised bed garden? We can help! We carry a variety of organic garden options. Stop by J&N Feed and Seed this Spring to speak with our Garden Experts!

Spring Pasture – Laminitis and Colic

Monday, April 2nd, 2018

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWinter has passed and spring is here and it’s time to get out of the indoor arena, to hit the trails again or start legging up for the summer show season.    Unfortunately, the long-awaited changing of the seasons can spell danger to horses on pasture. But by being aware of the potential problems and taking steps to protect your horses from them, you can still enjoy the season.

April showers bring May flowers….and lots of green, green grass

During this time of year, as pastures come out of winter dormancy their photosynthesis activity greatly increases. As a result, the grass becomes full to bursting with the byproduct of all this activity – sugars. Grass contains numerous different types and amounts of sugars depending on the species. Glucose, sucrose and fructose are produced through photosynthesis and used for energy and as building blocks of other plant components. Excess sugars are stored in the plant as starch and fructan. (Simple sugars, starch and fructan in plants are referred to as non-structural carbohydrate (NSC)).

Warm season grasses, such as Bermuda grass, crab grass and native grasses, store excess sugar as starch. Starch levels in these grasses may increase when they are grown under heat stress. Cool season grasses such as rye grass, orchard grass, timothy grass and fescue primarily store sugars as fructan. Studies have shown that there is a considerable variability in NSC levels in grasses depending on the season, ambient temperature, light intensity and time of day. In fact, NSC concentration is primarily a function of these environmental factors. NSC concentrations are highest during late spring, cool temperatures, bright sun and late afternoon. Interestingly, studies have also shown that there is an inverse relationship between nitrogen and NSC content. You would think that fertilized pastures that grow more robustly would have higher NSC content and on a per acre basis you would be correct. However, the concentration of NSC within the grass itself is lower if it has been fertilized.

When horses consume grass, starch is digested to glucose by enzymes in the small intestine and absorbed, along with the simple sugars contained in the plant. If too much starch is ingested, it many overwhelm the capacity of the small intestine to digest and absorb it, resulting in overflow into the hindgut (cecum and colon). Fructans and structural carbohydrates (cellulose, hemicellulose and pectins), pass undigested through the small intestine and into the cecum and colon where the microbial populations ferment them. Abnormal or elevated levels of fermentation within the cecum and colon may lead to increased production of gas which can result in colic.  If large amounts of fructan and starch reach the hindgut, a shift may occur in the microbial population favoring lactic acid-producing organisms. Excess lactic acid may decrease the pH in the hindgut, which can result in increased permeability of the intestinal wall, allowing various toxins and other substances into the blood stream where they may be carried to the hoof and incite laminitis.

Since not all horses grazing a spring pasture will experience problems like colic and laminitis, it is reasonable to assume that certain horses are more susceptible than others to the ingestion of NSC (especially fructan) in grasses. Horses that are obese or insulin resistant due to disease (such as Equine Cushing’s Syndrome or Equine Metabolic Syndrome), appear to be more susceptible than those with more moderate body condition and normal insulin sensitivity. Several conditions associated with being overweight or insulin resistant could exacerbate the effect of fructan and starch in the hindgut, including  increased stress on the hoof due to high body weight; the existence of a pro-inflammatory state which makes them more apt to produce an extreme inflammatory response; reduced glucose delivery to the cells of the lamina of the hoof; alteration in blood flow to the hoof; and/or changes in the function of the cells lining the blood vessels in the hoof.Prevention of pasture-associated laminitis and colic is relatively simple in theory but can be very challenging in practice. Limiting access to pastures during periods when NSC levels can be expected to be high (late spring, days that are sunny and cool, and during the late afternoon) is ideal. However, for many horse owners this may not be practical.  Alternatives to restricting pasture access include mowing pastures, building partitions in the pasture to limit the space where horses may graze lush grass, moving horses to shaded pastures, using grazing muzzles, limiting turnout times (2 to 4 hours per day), and feeding supplemental hay and concentrates to curb hunger with the hope of limiting pasture consumption. Maintaining horses in ideal body condition (BCS 4.5 to 6) may be one of the most important ways to minimize the risk of pasture associated laminitis and colic. (Go to www.horse.purinamills.com for more information about body condition scoring and weight management techniques). A regular, consistent exercise program is beneficial in controlling weight as well as stimulating gut motility which may help decrease the risk of colic. Being aware of the dangers associated with spring pastures and taking steps to protect your horses from them helps everyone to enjoy the season.

Source: Katherine Williamson, DVM

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