News & Updates Category Archive :: J & N Feed and Seed

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September Gardening Tips

Saturday, August 18th, 2018

September Gardening Tips

September Gardening Tips

September is a pivotal month for your landscape, with the official arrival of Autumn later this month, and hopefully, a return to cooler and wetter weather. It’s the gateway month between summer and fall gardening, so get outside and improve your landscape.

September is the time to apply lawn fertilizer to keep the grass healthy and growing up to the first frost. Always follow the directions on the package and avoid over-fertilizing, which will only damage your lawn. Fall-fertilized lawns are better equipped to make it through the winter and resume growth next spring than lawns that receive no fertilizer.

Double check your sprinklers carefully to make sure they are applying all that you expect in an even, uniform pattern.

Think back to last spring. Did you have lawn weeds in February and March before the grass started growing? Those were cool-season weeds, most of which germinated last fall. A pre-emergent herbicide applied in September will help reduce the recurrence of the same weeds next spring.

Sow Spring Wildflowers (like Bluebonnets) seeds now. For more reliable, uniform seed germination of our State flower, purchase acid-treated Bluebonnets seed. This treatment pits the seed coat, allowing nearly 100% germination in one to two weeks.

Need to add new shrubbery or trees to your landscape; this is a great month to do that. Fall landscaping done now will be well-rooted by next Spring and Summer.

Plant your fall vegetable garden. Plant cool-season vegetable garden with transplants of Broccoli, Cauliflower, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Chard, Collards, Lettuce, and Kale. Water your new vegetables and lightly top-dress with mulch to discourage weeds.

Three Trimesters that Last a Lifetime – Cow Gestation

Saturday, August 18th, 2018

Cow GestationMake the most of calf development during cow gestation.

When you think of the first moments of a calf’s life, you might picture a newborn calf vigorously nursing a healthy mama cow. You probably don’t think of that calf in utero. But a calf’s lifetime performance can hinge on the nine months before birth. That’s why it’s important to take advantage of the 283 days of a cow’s gestation and reduce the potential “bad days” she has during her pregnancy. “A bad day is when a pregnant cow loses weight due to stressors like poor nutrition, disease challenges or harsh environment,” says Ron Scott, Ph. D., director of beef research for Purina Animal Nutrition. “External stressors can impact the cow’s entire metabolism and how nutrients flow to the growing fetus.” Limiting the cow’s bad days and improve your chance of positively influencing fetal growth, which is important during every trimester.

 

Building a foundation

“You might wonder, ‘why is a little-bitty fetus such a big deal?’” says Scott. “It’s simple: The first trimester is when you’re building the foundation of life for a calf. During this time the placenta develops and serves as a hotel room service for the fetus for the rest of the pregnancy.” The placenta is a direct connection that provides oxygen and nutrients from the dam to the developing fetus. If the placenta is not well developed because of cow stress, reduced blood flow can negatively affect fetal nutrition throughout gestation.

The first trimester is also when the fetal brain, heart, liver and reproductive organs form.

“We typically don’t think about replacement heifer development until there’s a live calf on the ground,” says Scott. “But developing a successful replacement heifer begins in the first trimester when germ cells start forming the reproductive system developed in utero will affect a heifer’s fertility throughout her life.

 

Muscling up

During the second trimester, the fetus continues to grow organs and establish internal systems that influence those organs for a lifetime. Fetal muscle fiber development also begins during this time. “Cattle produce muscle we sell in the form of weight, but a stressed cow can lead to reduced muscle fiber development and, ultimately, lower carcass weights,” says Scott. “When you think about what we sell as an industry, the second trimester is vital.”

 

Preparing for parturition

Growth skyrockets during the last trimester, and lung development is critical as the calf prepares for breathing on its own.

“The calf has, hopefully, been in an excellent environment, getting all of its nutrition and oxygen from the dam,” says Scott. “But once it’s born, it’s going to need to breathe on its own. It’s also going to need a nutritious diet. Stress and nutrition for the cow during the third trimester impacts colostrum quality and quantity.”

 

The most critical time

Is there a most important trimester?

“That’s like asking a parent to pick their favorite child,” says Scott. “Each trimester is vital in its own way.”

Historically, the last trimester was considered the most important because of 75 percent of fetal growth occurs during this time. Recently, more attention has been paid to the first trimester when the foundation of life is occurring. More research is being conducted to determine exactly how important this stage really is.

“One thing is clear – each trimester plays a significant role,” says Scott. “Consistent, daily nutrition to the dam can help avoid bad days that shortchange a developing fetus and its future performance.”

 

Take out the guesswork

What does all of this mean for you nutrition program?

“You don’t want to overfeed because it means you’re overspending,” says Scott. “However, feed is an investment, and good-quality forage is essential, especially during extreme heat or cold when energy intake is compromised.”

Cattle nutrition requirements change with the season, and it can sometimes be challenging to know what to provide your cows. One solution that helps eliminate guesswork is Accuration Supplement with Intake Modifying Technology. Accuration Supplements are designed so cows only consume them when they need them, which allows cows to get the nutrition they need.

Three trimesters and zero bad days. Take a look at your herd. See if there are ways you can reduce stress, provide more consistent cow nutrition and set your calves up for a bright future.

 

Article Attributed to Purina Mills and Ron Scott, Ph. D.

Cattle Mineral Quick Tips

Friday, August 17th, 2018

Cattle Mineral Quick TipsBy Kent Tjardes

If you’re using a mineral form of fly control, like Wind and Rain Storm Fly Control Mineral, consistent intake is key. Calculate consumption to know if cattle are eating enough mineral to control the flies. Aim to hit the target intake listen on your feed tag. Target intake for loose mineral is two or four ounces per head per day if you are using either low salt or complete cattle mineral formula. Mineral tub target intake is six to eight ounces per head per day.

Remember, the active ingredient in Wind and Rain Storm Fly Control Mineral, Altosid IGR, only prevents hatching of new flies. It does not control existing flies. If you start using fly control mineral after flies are present, you’ll need other methods to combat adult flies. Work with your veterinarian or animal health supplier to find another method like spray or pour-on.

Source: Purina Checkpoint

Six Ways to Feed Performance Horses for Greater Achievement

Thursday, August 16th, 2018

Much like human athletes, performance horses have special nutritional needs.

And with all athletes, it’s important for diets to match activity and athletic level to reach the highest level of achievement.

These six tips may help you to supply your horse with adequate energy to support optimal performance.

1. Know if it’s anaerobic or aerobic exercise
Physical activity is broken into general categories, aerobic and anaerobic, and it can be helpful to understand the science.

Anaerobic exercise, characterized by short bursts of maximum effort, is primarily fueled by glycogen, a polysaccharide which is composed of sugars and stored in muscle fibers. Soluble carbohydrates from your horse’s diet provide the building blocks for glycogen.

Imagine a competitive cutting horse with its incredible agility, quick reactions and strength. A horse like this would be primarily engaged in anaerobic exercise while they’re working a cow. Race horses and even Thoroughbreds running a mile and a half are also highly anaerobic while they’re running the race. Such activity depends on a diet providing adequate soluble carbohydrates to store and replenish muscle glycogen needed to fuel these short, intense exercise bouts.

Aerobic exercise, characterized by low to moderate-intensity activity lasting from several minutes to several hours, is primarily fueled by fat. A slow burning fuel, fat can be perfect for keeping the horse going for the long haul.

Three-day eventing, polo, dressage, and endurance riding are all examples of activities that are primarily aerobic. Performance horses engaged in this type of exercise may benefit from high fat horse feeds.

Keep in mind, no performance activity is either all anaerobic or all aerobic; each athletic activity has components of both types of work, especially when you consider the warm-up period before an actual competition. However, fueling the horse with the dietary energy source from which they will draw the most fuel is a targeted way to optimize the horse’s ability to perform.

2. Don’t let forages fall flat
While horses in nature may live entirely on forage, equestrians typically demand more from their horses than would ever be required of them in nature. Therefore, supplemental nutrients and energy are needed to sustain top-level performance in working horses.

Forage can provide adequate fuel for maintenance or very low level activity, but does not supply enough sugar and starch to maintain the glycogen stores required for a hard-working performance horse to succeed. For horses working at a high level, a feed designed to support that workload will provide adequate soluble carbohydrates and fats to maintain the needed fuel storage for performance.

3. Electrolytes are essential
Horses generally need free choice salt, such as Purina® Free Balance® 12:12 Vitamin and Mineral Supplement, but performance horses have additional mineral requirements. Any time a horse is working and sweating, consider an electrolyte supplement and feed as directed.

Check the ingredients on electrolytes in your horse feed. They should include primarily sodium, potassium and chloride. Always ensure your performance horse has adequate access to fresh, clean water and is well hydrated. Do not give electrolyte supplementation to a dehydrated horse.

4. Time the feed
Horses should not be fed a large meal 3-4 hours before an extensive performance event. Feeding any closer to the exercise can have an adverse effect on the horse’s performance, as the blood used for digestion isn’t readily available to the muscle tissue.

If a horse usually has hay available, consider feeding small amounts of hay throughout the day. Feeding forages before an event may not pose the same challenges as a concentrated feed does. Generally speaking, feeding small meals more often is better for the performance horse than one or two large meals a day.

After the event, let the horse cool down before feeding and then consider feeding a small carbohydrate-rich meal, such as Purina® Ultium® Competition Horse Formula, 30-120 minutes after exercise to help replace the glycogen used during the event.

5. Focus on recovery
Recovery from exercise requires the replenishment of glycogen stores as well of the repair of muscle cells damaged during exercise. Research in humans and horses has shown that ingesting specific amino acids after exercise can decrease muscle recovery time. Horses performing intense, repetitive work have been shown to benefit from a very specific amino acid profile available in a dietary supplement, such as Purina® SuperSportAmino Acid Supplement.

AdobeStock_Grey Chesnut Horses Running_660876896. Rethink top-dressing
Horse owners often try to provide additional fat to their performance horses. However, simply top-dressing with oil or an unfortified fat supplement increases the fat and calorie content of the ration, but it doesn’t provide protein, vitamins or minerals to maintain the nutritional balance of the total diet. The best option is to feed a nutritionally balanced feed with a high fat content as well as the proper amount of protein, amino acids, and other nutrients essential to support optimal performance. Consider feeding Purina® Amplify® High-Fat Supplement formulated for horses needing: extra calories from fat for weight gain, conditioning, competition, showing or sales preparation.

Paying attention to these six areas may help your working horse achieve its true performance potential.

Looking for a way to get that shiny show-stopping coat? Read feeding horses for a shiny coat.

 

Cattle Water Intake: Did you know?

Thursday, August 2nd, 2018

By Christina Hayes

We focus on balancing cattle diets for energy, protein, vitamins, and minerals, but we tend to overlook water. Every physiological process involves water, and it’s requirement for cattle performance.

Here are some quick water tips:

  • Water quality and quantity can impact feed intake. Limited access to water or low-quality water typically results in reduced intakes.
  • Water quality is affected by microbiological contaminants, nitrates, sulfates, and salinity (the amount of salt dissolved in water). Test your water quality by contacting your local extension agent for sampling instructions and information.
  • Water needs increase as temperature increases. For example, a 900-pound lactating cow only needs 14.5 gallons of water per day when it’s 60 degrees Fahrenheit, but she needs as much as 18.2 gallons per day when the temperature hits 90 degrees.
  • Cattle weight also influences water needs. As cattle gain weight, their daily water intake increases. For example, a 1,400-pound mature bull typically consumes 13.4 gallons of water per day when it’s 80 degrees Fahrenheit, but a 1600+ bull consumes just over a gallon more per day (14.5 gallons) at the same temperature.

Summer can get busy, but for your cattle things can heat up, which makes water even more important. Ensure cattle always have access to fresh, high-quality water. Also, ensure there are enough easily accessible waterers especially when temperatures spike.

Source: Purina Checkpoint

Stock Tanks & Water Troughs At J&N Feed

Wednesday, August 1st, 2018

Stock tanks

J&N Feed and Seed carries a full lineup of stock tanks and water troughs, ranging in size from 15 gallons up to 700 gallons. Whether you’re looking for a galvanized steel or heavy-duty poly stock tank, we have the options to fit any size needed.  Choose from brands such as Tarter, HW, Rubbermaid, and Sheffield. Stock tanks are one of the most important pieces of equipment you own, responsible for providing your livestock with a constant access to clean, fresh, drinkable water. Your livestock count on you for the fresh water they need each and every day.

We also have the accessories you need to keep things flowing smoothly – from float tanks and plugs to chemical-free tank treatments that greatly reduce the need to dump and scrub tanks. And since we know that keeping that water from freezing in harsh temperatures can be a challenge, we carry a selection of floating, sinking and drain plug deicers, as well as heated buckets for use with smaller breeds and animals.

Your livestock count on you for fresh water every day and J&N Feed can help you deliver, day in and day out. Stop by J&N Feed and Seed and let our experts help you choose the right products for your livestock needs.

Fall Deer Corn Booking – Buy In Bulk & Save

Tuesday, July 31st, 2018

Deer Corn Booking

Lock in the BEST PRICE on whole deer corn with our annual Deer Corn Booking at J&N Feed and Seed. J&N Deer Corn Booking kicks off mid-August and will continue until mid to late October. Stop by the store located at 450 Pecan St, Graham, Texas, or give us a call for current pricing. Booking your deer corn is a great way to lock in the low price all season long. Questions? Please give us a call at 940-549-4631. J&N is your deer corn headquarters. Save time and money this season by buying your deer corn in bulk.  If you book more than you need, no problem! Talk to us about securing a store credit.

Stop by J&N Feed and Seed for all your hunting supplies. Come to see us for wildlife feeds, attractants stands, ammo and so much more.

 

Cattle Lac Liquid Cattle Feed at J&N Feed and Seed

Tuesday, July 31st, 2018

Liquid Cattle FeedJ & N Feed and Seed offers bulk and liquid cattle feed (Cattle-Lac liquid feed) to the Graham and surrounding communities. We have trailers available for use with purchase in addition to bulk delivery. Bring your trip-hoppers and pick up or we can arrange delivery to your ranch.  Talk to us about your needs, give us a call at (940) 549-4631.

Cattle-Lac Liquids helps farmers get the very most out of their valuable pasture land. The CATTLE-LAC supplement actually stimulates beneficial bacteria in the cattle rumen, allowing the animal to break down grass roughage faster and easier.  The cattle then eat more grass, which means a healthier, heavier animal. The bottom line is that farmers who feed CATTLE-LAC supplements get the maximum amount of meat per acre of pasture.

 

 

2018-2019 Livestock Shows

Saturday, July 21st, 2018

2018-2019 Livestock Shows2018-2019 Livestock Shows for the upcoming season are right around the corner!

The calendar is set for the 2018-2019 Livestock Shows in Texas.  Here are the dates and locations happening throughout Texas. Go to the links for each Stock Show to learn more about event schedules, entry forms, ticket information and more:

State Fair of Texas (Dallas): September 28 – October 21, 2018

Heart O’ Texas Fair & Rodeo (Waco): October 4 – October 13, 2018

Southwestern Exposition & Livestock Show (Fort Worth): January 18 – February 9, 2019

San Angelo Stock Show & Rodeo (San Angelo): February 1 – 17, 2019

San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo (San Antonio): February 7 – 24, 2019

Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo (Houston): February 25 –  March 17, 2019

Star of Texas Fair & Rodeo (Austin): March 16 – 30, 2019

Livestock shows are the perfect way to spend some time with the family! Save the date and make plans to come to one of these rodeos near you!

Tips to Help Your Horse Beat the Summer Heat

Friday, July 20th, 2018
 summer heatKatie Young

Ph.D. – Senior Nutritionist & Product Manager, Equine Technical Solutions

The summer heat is here! Heat and humidity place an added burden on horses during training, showing and transporting.

Especially during the busy summer travel and show season, it’s important to make sure your horse is not becoming overheated, stays sufficiently hydrated and remains comfortable, even when temperatures soar.

In this video, Dr. Katie Young, equine nutritionist and manager of equine technical services at Purina Animal Nutrition shares tips for horse owners to help ensure a healthy summer season including heading off heat stress, staying hydrated, replenishing electrolytes and staying comfortable in hot weather.

Article Attributed to Purina and Dr. Katie Young

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